AMD Finally Opens Up Its Radeon Raytracing Analyzer "RRA" Source Code

Written by Michael Larabel in Radeon on 18 November 2022 at 06:30 AM EST. 15 Comments
RADEON --
This summer AMD announced the Radeon Raytracing Analyzer "RRA" as part of their developer software suite for helping to profile ray-tracing performance/issues on Windows and Linux with both Direct3D 12 and the Vulkan API. Initially the RRA 1.0 release was binary-only but now AMD has made good on their "GPUOpen" approach and made it open-source.

As noted back in my original article from July on the Radeon Raytracing Analyzer release:
Radeon Raytracing Analyzer is hosted on GitHub but the only content in the actual Git repository right now is documentation, so it would appear that at least initially this is a closed-source package though some documentation also says it's MIT licensed.

This week that has been cleared up with the Radeon Raytracing Analyzer source code going public. There are build instructions for compiling the RRA 1.0 sources on both Microsoft Windows and Linux while the Linux instructions are tailoring to Ubuntu use. Building the Radeon Raytracing Analyzer depends upon the Qt 5.15 toolkit.


GPUOpen, Radeon Raytracing Analyzer (RRA)


AMD announced the RRA source code availability this week on GPUOpen.com. AMD also made the Radeon Data File "RDF" file format available as well as a storage format for the RRA and other AMD tooling.

The Radeon Raytracing Analyzer source code drop comes in at 69k lines of code and can be downloaded via GitHub. It's nice to see this open-source release happen especially with Mesa's RADV having added RRA support in addition to AMD's closed-source Vulkan/D3D12 drivers supporting it.
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