Mesa 20.1 So Far Contains Two PCI IDs So Far For Intel Xe Graphics Plus 9 Other Tiger Lake IDs
Written by Michael Larabel in Intel on 22 March 2020 at 07:30 AM EDT. Add A Comment
INTEL --
In recent days we have seen Intel refining their list of PCI IDs for the next-gen and highly anticipated "Gen12" graphics within the open-source Linux Mesa 20.1 driver stack.

Intel has been adding a few more PCI IDs as part of their Gen12/Tigerlake listing and most notably changing the first product strings to reflect "Xe Graphics".

As of this weekend two "Intel(R) Graphics" strings were changed to "Intel(R) Xe Graphics", likely denoting the discrete GPU models. Those are for PCI IDs 0x9A40 and 0x9A49.

Meanwhile we are up to nine other PCI IDs for Gen12/Tigerlake (TGL) that at least so far are retaining the Intel Graphics or Intel UHD Graphics strings and a mix of GT1 and GT2. Those IDs include 0x9A59, 0x9A60, 0x9A68, 0x9A70, 0x9A78, 0x9AC0, 0x9AC9, 0x9AD9, and 0x9AF8.

It's important to keep in mind, however, that this doesn't mean there will be so many different Gen12 graphics offerings. Sometimes PCI IDs are reserved for possible future but currently unplanned models as well as sometimes PCI IDs being reserved just for engineering/pre-production purposes. As we've been seeing more Tiger Lake PCI IDs added in recent days, there is also the possibility of even more being added moving in the near future.


It's with the forthcoming Linux 5.7 kernel that is the first release where the Gen12 graphics are considered stable to the point the support is exposed by default and not hidden behind a kernel module parameter.

The first Tiger Lake mobile processors and Xe discrete GPUs are expected later this calendar year.
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 20,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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