AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D On Linux: Not For Gaming, But Very Exciting For Other Workloads

Written by Michael Larabel in Processors on 25 April 2022. Page 3 of 8. 56 Comments
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming

After the Linux gaming tests on the Ryzen 7 5800X3D, it was on to carpet bombing the CPU with dozens of other benchmarks via the Phoronix Test Suite for various Linux compute workloads and other areas of possible interest for this AMD 3D V-Cache processor.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming

Many of the same HPC benchmarks that enjoyed much uplift with recently reviewed Milan-X obviously did well on the Ryzen 7 5800X3D compared to the Ryzen 7 5800X. But keep in mind the 3D V-Cache on the consumer side is only available as an 8-core part... For many of these HPC benchmarks, having 16 cores will outweigh the benefit of 8-cores with the 3D V-Cache... I can't wait to see a flagship Ryzen CPU with 3D V-Cache for making things really interesting.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming

For those using lczero for chess via neural networks, this was one of many AI areas where the Ryzen 7 5800X3D performed very well over the Ryzen 7 5800X even with the non-3D part having the higher clock speeds.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming

But in other areas, the Ryzen 7 5800X3D was of little use... The 5800X3D is highly dependent upon the particular workloads in being able to make use of the large 3D V-Cache.

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Linux Gaming

OpenFOAM CFD and Incompact3D for additional technical computing areas showed much advantage to the large L3 cache with the Ryzen 7 5800X3D... Now if only there were more 3D V-Cache models with higher core counts near the top of the Ryzen space. OpenFOAM is one of the great real-world areas that saw much benefit with Milan-X.


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