Intel Readies More Meteor Lake Graphics Driver Code For Linux 6.2

Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel on 18 November 2022 at 05:27 AM EST. Add A Comment
LINUX KERNEL --
With Linux 6.1-rc6 due out this weekend we are reaching the point at which the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem maintainers will be cutting off new feature code from being queued into DRM-Next ahead of the upcoming Linux 6.2 cycle. Intel engineers today sent out a final batch of drm-intel-gt-next changes to make it for this next kernel version.

With this last drm-intel-gt-next feature pull for Linux 6.2, there are various memory management fixes, demoting GuC kernel contexts to normal priority, and continued work around Meteor Lake graphics enablement.

Intel's open-source Linux graphics driver engineers have already been working on Meteor Lake enablement for months and more code is ready for v6.2. However, they aren't over the finish line yet as there still is more code pending for going into what will be Linux 6.3. Given that the Intel Meteor Lake launch is at least roughly a year away -- or potentially 2024 now if delay rumors are true -- there still is plenty of time to get this open-source Linux graphics driver support squared away.

The Meteor Lake enablement has shown this Raptor Lake successor to have roughly DG2/Alchemist class features/capabilities while in integrated form for these next-gen CPUs. Today's pull request has various fixes and workarounds for Meteor Lake, GSC CS improvements for reset and interrupt support, and a new GuC de-privilege feature being introduced.

The list of this last batch of Intel GT feature patches ahead of the Linux 6.2 merge window can be found via this pull request.
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 20,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter, LinkedIn, or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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