DRM Changes For Linux 5.1 Bring Intel Fastboot, Komeda Driver & Other Improvements
Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel on 6 March 2019 at 04:28 PM EST. Add A Comment
LINUX KERNEL --
These changes really shouldn't come as much of a surprise considering all of the major changes we've covered individually in recent weeks on Phoronix, but the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) graphics/display driver changes have now been submitted for the Linux 5.1 kernel.

New feature activity for the DRM drivers in Linux 5.1 includes:

- Intel Skylake and newer (along with select Atom hardware) has enabled Fastboot by default to provide a flicker-free/smooth boot experience by avoiding unnecessary mode-sets.

- Intel Coffeelake GVT support has finally come for graphics virtualization. Also on that front is VFIO EDID region support.

- Nouveau Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM) support for providing Shared Virtual Memory (SVM) support for this open-source NVIDIA Linux driver.

- Improved DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP MST).

- AMDGPU Vega 10/20 BACO (Bus Active, Chip Off) support.

- Delta Color Compression (DCC) for scan-out surfaces, initially relevant for Raven Ridge hardware along with relevant user-space code pending.

- AMDGPU fixes around Vega 20 PCIe DPM switching, context priority handling, GPUVM, SR-IOV, and other fixes.

- The Allwinner A23 is now supported by the Sun4i DRM driver along with implicit fencing support and other improvements.

- The Arm Komeda driver has been merged for next-gen display support.

The complete list of DRM changes for Linux 5.1 are outlined here.
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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