NVIDIA JTX1: Finally An Exciting 64-bit ARM Board!
Written by Michael Larabel in Computers on 10 November 2015. Page 2 of 2. 50 Comments

An Ubuntu 14.04 LTS sample file-system will be available with Linux 4 Tegra as the default operating system on the Jetson TX1. It should also be possible to load Fedora and other AArch64 distributions onto the hardware. Vulkan will be supported on the JTX1 once NVIDIA rolls out their Vulkan Linux driver, but for now there's full OpenGL and OpenGL ES. Of course, the graphics are backed by their unified binary Linux driver while the Tegra K1/X1 support within Nouveau remains ongoing.

The Jetson TX1 developer kit is more expensive than 64-bit ARM development boards offered through 96Boards and other low-end solutions, but is cheaper than the likes of the APM Mustang: the Jetson TX1 Developer Kit will retail for $599 USD and there will be an educational version for $299. It's steep, but you're getting a mighty powerful ARM development board. The Jetson TX1 kit will begin shipping next week in the US.

If you're after using the Jetson TX1 within devices by using the board-to-board 400-pin interface, you can buy the Tegra X1 module standalone for $299 beginning early next year. This 400-pin interface will allow third-parties to more easily utilize the power of the Tegra X1 without having to fabricate their own board with a Tegra SoC like they had to do with the Tegra K1.

Well, those are the quick details to share today... Stay tuned for the lift of the rest of the embargo so you can be enlightened by a ton of benchmarks with the Jetson Tegra X1 running on Ubuntu. For now though you can see some Tegra X1 benchmarks I did a few months ago within NVIDIA's Tegra X1 Delivers Stunning Performance On Ubuntu Linux thanks to some hackery around the SHIELD Android TV.


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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.


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