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Microsoft Makes Their C++ Standard Library Open-Source (STL)

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  • #31
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    The desktop isn't that dead. Look at how many people still use desktops (you can count gamers). Maybe you mean the majority of their income isn't Windows anymore.



    Only partially true. The big application stores (App Store and Google Play) still use the selling software model, bar a few subscription-based applications like Netflix.
    Tools (desktop applications) vs services (webs),... Some services replace tools overtime, but not everybody trusts services to maintain their, and own, their data.... But, people tend to become lazy and comfortable, and services gained quite big amount of trust nowadays,..

    There are still areas of industry, where specialized software is needed, which demand lots of power and require low latency for good experience,.. these will remain as tools, for long time. For example, photography, video-editing, software development, CAD,..

    However, the most common workloads converge to:

    - web-based information systems for internal purposes,
    - web-pages and web-applications for interaction with public and client,
    - email for communication,
    - shared drives to exchange big files,
    - ms/libre office documents.

    So, in the end, everything converges to having only few tools acting as clients for: HTTP(S), IMAP+SMPT, and optionally some (S)FTP or NFS.

    And, for private use, it's usually: facebook, twitter, gmail, google drive.

    Yep,.. desktop becomes more-or-less obsolete. Many old-school people still cling to desktop, as they feel need to be able to install anything they want. However, young people, not using their computer for special demanding areas, doesn't feel need to have desktop. So, chromebooks would become reality, soon.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by carewolf View Post
      Why would it need to be reverse engineered? This is the standard C++ library we are talking about, not a private Windows API.
      It has been a couple of decades since I have done programming in Visual Studio but at least back then their standard C++ library wasn't even remotely standard.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by carewolf View Post

        Well, it could have bugs that could be figured out this way and better emulated in case some software depends on it, but most of the quirks of MSVC have been slowly rooted out the last few years, and MSVC is now behaving more standard compliant than Apple's fork of clang, and their library implementation better than libc++.
        I see. Thanks for the information!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by MadeUpName View Post

          I will take Gimp + Darktable over Photoshop + Lightroom any day of the week. Now that Davinci Resolve is working well on Linux that fixes my video issues and I will take DR over over the Adoble tools any day of the week and lots of people are moving in that direction. I don't get into the layout part so I can't speak to that, but as a professional photographer/videographer Linux is rocking my world.
          Why not Krita + Darktable? GIMP feels outdated at times.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by kravemir View Post

            Tools (desktop applications) vs services (webs),... Some services replace tools overtime, but not everybody trusts services to maintain their, and own, their data.... But, people tend to become lazy and comfortable, and services gained quite big amount of trust nowadays,..
            Exactly, and especially the paragraph I highlighted.

            Originally posted by kravemir View Post
            There are still areas of industry, where specialized software is needed, which demand lots of power and require low latency for good experience,.. these will remain as tools, for long time. For example, photography, video-editing, software development, CAD,..
            See Adobe. They use a subscription model for the tools they provide (Creative Cloud).

            Originally posted by kravemir View Post
            However, the most common workloads converge to:

            - web-based information systems for internal purposes,
            - web-pages and web-applications for interaction with public and client,
            - email for communication,
            - shared drives to exchange big files,
            - ms/libre office documents.

            So, in the end, everything converges to having only few tools acting as clients for: HTTP(S), IMAP+SMPT, and optionally some (S)FTP or NFS.

            And, for private use, it's usually: facebook, twitter, gmail, google drive.

            Yep,.. desktop becomes more-or-less obsolete. Many old-school people still cling to desktop, as they feel need to be able to install anything they want. However, young people, not using their computer for special demanding areas, doesn't feel need to have desktop. So, chromebooks would become reality, soon.
            I see.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by reavertm View Post
              I wouldn't be surprised if Microsoft followed with opensourcing their compiler soon.
              Maybe they will announce it at their Linux conference?
              https://news.softpedia.com/news/firs...0-527424.shtml

              Comment


              • #37
                I'm not Windows-savvy at all. Can anybody, please, explain to me, how is Microsoft STL better/different thatn GNU STL?

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                  Actual competition.
                  Yes, but it's with older Microsoft products (Windows 7 for example) not Linux.

                  Opensource is a way to cut costs. As Windows 10 nets in less and less money because Moore's law ceased and you can run 10 years old hardware without major issues, they are in the desperate need of cutting costs.

                  Will it work? We will see in the coming years.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                    See Adobe. They use a subscription model for the tools they provide (Creative Cloud).
                    Subscription-based license does not mean that the tool is run in the cloud.
                    He meant that most workstation applications have to remain local applications and can't just migrate to the cloud.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                      Subscription-based license does not mean that the tool is run in the cloud.
                      He meant that most workstation applications have to remain local applications and can't just migrate to the cloud.
                      Office 365 also runs locally? Or did this change?

                      Comment

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