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openSUSE Slowroll Released As A Slower Alternative To openSUSE Tumbleweed

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  • #31
    Actually I really just want to see Kalpa succeed and get an official release. More reliable than Tumbleweed, not coming with an unusable DE (gn*me) like Aeon.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by user1 View Post

      But Slowroll will still benefit from the automated OpenQA testing, something which neither Manjaro nor other Arch derivative nor Arch itself have.
      The QA when using Manjaro comes from Arch, and then Manjaro testing users, and only then Stable release is made.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by mskarbek View Post
        So, basically, they made the equivalent of CentOS Stream in the SUSE ecosystem.
        You either have no idea how CentOS Stream works, how any of the OpenSUSE offerings work, or both. CentOS Stream is just ahead of the next RHEL beta. How in the world is that the equivalent of a slightly slowed down Tumbleweed?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post

          The QA when using Manjaro comes from Arch, and then Manjaro testing users, and only then Stable release is made.
          I know, but my point is that neither Manjaro nor Arch use any form of automated testing, which is a disadvantage because humans can't catch certain bugs.. And like I said in another comments, with OpenQA you'll never receive an update that will leave your system unbootable, something from which both Manjaro and Arch suffered not once.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

            There's nothing confidence-inspiring about a project that cannot even decide which repositories it should use.



            Slowroll and Slowroll: are not symlinks and each folder contain different packages with different versions.
            One is a staging repo...

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            • #36
              Originally posted by user1 View Post

              Even if I currently don't use it, I consider tumbleweed the only rolling release distro that I accept to use. Even if something breaks because of an update, in Tumbleweed it's still way less serious compared to Arch or Debian Unstable. For example, (unless you have Nvidia or other proprietary drivers), Tumbleweed will never release an update that will leave your system unbootable. Because it's something that OpenQA will definitely catch. Also, in case of Arch, I find the whole "certain updates require manual intervention" thing unacceptable and it's one of the reasons I don't consider Arch a serious distro even for regular daily usage. I guess the reason Tumbleweed is less popular than Arch and the other distros based on it is the AUR. But then again, these days we have a wonderful thing called distrobox.
              I have read about ARCH users switching to tumbleweed, because its more user friendly.
              And yes I nearly fainted when reading this.

              I love tumbleweed but there are sometimes minor issues.
              The updater complaining it cant find a certain package. This usual gets fixed within a day or two.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post

                The QA when using Manjaro comes from Arch, and then Manjaro testing users, and only then Stable release is made.
                You seem to have no idea what OpenQA is…

                And even then, there are people using openSUSE Factory, where bugs and issues are also found. So openSUSE uses a combination of automated and human testing.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Gps4life View Post

                  I have read about ARCH users switching to tumbleweed, because its more user friendly.
                  And yes I nearly fainted when reading this.

                  I love tumbleweed but there are sometimes minor issues.
                  The updater complaining it cant find a certain package. This usual gets fixed within a day or two.
                  Even this would usually be because the user had added a 3rd party repo like Packman and something happened on their end that delayed a build.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by drake23 View Post
                    Wouldn't it make sense to base the future leap on ALP? Isn't that what micro is etc is about? I must admit I am way too confused by their product strategies...
                    You can read all the gory details in this thread:

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by user1 View Post

                      I know, but my point is that neither Manjaro nor Arch use any form of automated testing, which is a disadvantage because humans can't catch certain bugs.. And like I said in another comments, with OpenQA you'll never receive an update that will leave your system unbootable, something from which both Manjaro and Arch suffered not once.
                      That is quite a delusional claim, as no QA can catch all possible configuration that might lead to being unbootable. For it to be possible there should be 1:1 virtualization of all supported hardware, and that is very near impossible to achieve. (or of course having all possible hardware configurations in the QA farm to run natively, impossible on same scale)

                      Having hundreds of thousands of real world testers trying it out before the mainstream gets an update is the next best thing after automated at scale QA churning.
                      Last edited by varikonniemi; 12 September 2023, 12:36 PM.

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