Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OpenBSD 7.3 Released With AMD RDNA3 Graphics, Guided Disk Encryption

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OpenBSD 7.3 Released With AMD RDNA3 Graphics, Guided Disk Encryption

    Phoronix: OpenBSD 7.3 Released With AMD RDNA3 Graphics, Guided Disk Encryption

    Theo de Raadt has released OpenBSD 7.3 today as the 54th release for this BSD operating system project...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    I managed to find a mirror yesterday with the install sets open ahead of the announcement, which doesn't always happen. The full disk encryption setup is the default configuration now for new installs, and it's integrated so well into the installer that it's near seamless. It also allows you to more easily adjust partition allocations once you get to the space layout - something no Linux installer I've seen yet (Fedora/RHEL, Debian installers, OpenSUSE) does in so easy a manner. I'm suitably impressed. I like what they did with it very much.
    Last edited by stormcrow; 10 April 2023, 11:28 AM. Reason: clarity

    Comment


    • #3
      I actually look forward to these updates. Almost like the MS-DOS, Windows 3.x days.

      When any other OS updates, I am not filled with joy :/

      For one, when OpenBSD updates, I know Xenocara, ifconfig, and the standard init system will still be there
      Last edited by kpedersen; 10 April 2023, 11:43 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Michael, would love it if we could get some benchmarks, especially so if you match the hardware to an older benchmark post so we can see what if any performance results are made between versions. I think last time you went with comet lake processors and they booted just fine.‚Äč

        Comment


        • #5
          Updated my gitea server and everything went perfectly well. As always I followed the post upgrade instructions and everything was done in 5 minutes.

          God everything is so tightly integrated and well documented...if only I could use it as my daily driver. So little is missing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by kvuj View Post
            Updated my gitea server and everything went perfectly well. As always I followed the post upgrade instructions and everything was done in 5 minutes.

            God everything is so tightly integrated and well documented...if only I could use it as my daily driver. So little is missing.
            Yes, this. Unfortunately while OpenBSD is very interesting technically, it's just not useful as a daily system for me between limited software and hardware support. Even if I ignore games, there's just no way to do a lot of what I do daily on OpenBSD.

            Comment


            • #7
              I still need to take a look on OpenBSD or FreeBSD sometime, both looks rock solid, but every time I go to their sites, it feels like they don't care that much to UI/UX, so I end every time postponing. One site looks like a template of Microsoft Frontpage 97, and the other looks like WineHQ page. I mean, it doesn't need to be fancy, but it need to show that it's improving over the time

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by fagnerln View Post
                I still need to take a look on OpenBSD or FreeBSD sometime, both looks rock solid, but every time I go to their sites, it feels like they don't care that much to UI/UX, so I end every time postponing. One site looks like a template of Microsoft Frontpage 97, and the other looks like WineHQ page. I mean, it doesn't need to be fancy, but it need to show that it's improving over the time
                Not liking the website seems like an odd flex to not try an OS out for. I mean Slackware is a well respected Linux distro and it has a website that loads in seconds even on a dial up connection. I for one appreciate a websites simplicity. Not every web site needs to be like Facebook where the web site is a freaking application in and of itself and it gobbles of loads of RAM. The FreeBSD site is easy to navigate and contains the handbook which is all you need to know. The OpenBSD website contains links to the man pages and FAQ and the upgrade instructions. I know I can get any info I need about a release or soon to be release by going to openbsd [dot] org / 7x.html where x is the version. I mean the Xubuntu site isn't that complex either and it is a great distro too. I don't see how complex website == good OS? I just don't get it? But to each their own! Run what works best for you!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Anyone know if that auto install with FDE wipes /dev/urandom to the disk first or if it doesn't do that and that step needs to be done manually? I couldn't find anything in the release notes. Also, with DRM from Linux 6.1 is ARC graphics Alchemist supported yet or will we have to wait till 7.4 or 7.5 for those?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

                    Yes, this. Unfortunately while OpenBSD is very interesting technically, it's just not useful as a daily system for me between limited software and hardware support. Even if I ignore games, there's just no way to do a lot of what I do daily on OpenBSD.
                    There's always vmd.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X