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Firefox Private Network Is Now Official As Mozilla VPN

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Almindor View Post

    I guess cryptocurrency suddenly looks pretty good huh? No need for those pesky credit companies. Some VPNs will accept BTC so you can buy "anonymously" but of course they still see your IP in the end.
    No. Cryptocurrency never looks good. I'd say cryptocurrency is like buying fool's gold, but fool's gold is an actual thing. Cryptocurrency is no different than money deposited into a bank account - it's just electrons aligned on a hard drive that can be manipulated on a whim. The real commodity in cryptocurrency is electricity to run the machines to store it. I had this discussion elsewhere....

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    • #22
      Originally posted by edwaleni View Post

      "Protect your floppy, before you copy"
      "A letter is better"

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      • #23
        This video was brought to you by Mozilla VPN.

        On a serious note though, I do trust Mozilla more than say NordVPN or the likes because there is an established brand behind it. But VPNs (proxies) generally are inherently not privacy-respecting. VPN providers tend to promise their users not to keep logs; in reality there is no way for you to verify that, especially not when it comes to targeted logging. It is also usually not in a VPN provider's (or the government of its jurisdiction's) best interest to throw away valuable information about people that want to hide.

        More information about the inherent problems of VPNs can be found here: https://gist.github.com/joepie91/5a9909939e6ce7d09e29

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Giovanni Fabbro View Post

          "A letter is better"
          Only if you can dictate it to your secretary. Otherwise it's hand-action and hand-action is never better.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Giovanni Fabbro View Post
            And the credit card processor will have your ID on file too.
            Don't pay with credit card, duh.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Giovanni Fabbro View Post
              The Internet is made for making connections. If you want privacy, don't Internet. Go outside maybe. And leave your phone at home.
              Only sith reason in absolutes. There is a whole world of shades of gray between running ass-naked and maximum security.
              Here we are talking about normal people protecting their privacy from commercial and government entities acting in a mostly legal manner, a VPN is enough.

              If your goal is stopping black hat CIA/FBI espionage shit that drops from black helicopters to steal your data through EMI exfiltration, you really are in a different ballpark alltogether.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Giovanni Fabbro View Post
                Cryptocurrency is no different than money deposited into a bank account - it's just electrons aligned on a hard drive that can be manipulated on a whim.
                Ok boomer.

                It's actually harder to manipulate than bank accounts, and it has nothing to do with the technology involved.

                You MIGHT get away with manipulating a bank account if you have enough control and understanding of the internal system of a bank as that's basically a crappy database. There are usually checks and redundancies with paperwork and signatures and stuff so it's not as easy as a one-liner SQL, but it's doable if you have an insider.

                With a decent cryptovalue EVERYONE has the "database" (the "block chain") so you would need to change their database too for your transaction to be valid. Good luck with that if the cryptovalue is not Dogecoin or some toy shit with 10 miners total, you would need billions of dollars of mining equipment to overpower them and take over the lead so you can actually record the transaction in a legit way.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Giovanni Fabbro View Post
                  It's been established that credit card processing companies will sell your purchase history to advertisers. Add in a VPN subscription, and they might flag you as being a sort-of extremist.
                  There are two ways of fighting such flagging systems, one is avoiding the flag (obviously), the other is making sure so much people get flagged that the system becomes laughably ineffective and is changed or retired.

                  This is one of the main reasons Tor people keep evangelizing, if many people just use it every day all the time, it creates enough background noise that catching the actual few that need to use it for safety becomes impossible.

                  It affects your other purchase options, one of the biggest of which is insurance.
                  Non-issue outside the US, in the dirty, socialist hellhole called EU.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by board View Post
                    On a serious note though, I do trust Mozilla more than say NordVPN or the likes because there is an established brand behind it. But VPNs (proxies) generally are inherently not privacy-respecting
                    "allegedly"

                    That said, for many people in the US it's well-known the ISP is snooping, redirecting or even throttling some content (Verizon vs Netflix for example) because of blatant conflict of interest (they are media providers too).

                    So yes a company in a country that is overseas and cannot be easily contacted by your government unless you did something so bad that you attracted Interpol's attention (at which point a VPN is the least of your worries) might actually have logs of what you are doing (usually nothing particularly bad), but is it that bad at the end of the day?

                    I mean, this isn't for protecting high profile targets like Snowden, but to keep shitbags like Verizon from throtling your Netflix or selling your browsing history to your government and avoid getting cease and desist letters for all the torrenting you are doing and such.
                    Last edited by starshipeleven; 18 June 2020, 05:50 PM.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by board View Post
                      This video was brought to you by Mozilla VPN.

                      On a serious note though, I do trust Mozilla more than say NordVPN or the likes because there is an established brand behind it. But VPNs (proxies) generally are inherently not privacy-respecting. VPN providers tend to promise their users not to keep logs; in reality there is no way for you to verify that, especially not when it comes to targeted logging. It is also usually not in a VPN provider's (or the government of its jurisdiction's) best interest to throw away valuable information about people that want to hide.

                      More information about the inherent problems of VPNs can be found here: https://gist.github.com/joepie91/5a9909939e6ce7d09e29
                      I've always found public VPNs to be more like honeypots. Wanna know who sends shady stuff? Start by looking at VPN users. But that may be just in my head, DPI can do as good a job anyway.
                      Corporate VPNs are another story though.

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