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DDR4 vs. DDR5 Memory Performance For Intel Core i5-12600K Alder Lake On Linux

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  • DDR4 vs. DDR5 Memory Performance For Intel Core i5-12600K Alder Lake On Linux

    Phoronix: DDR4 vs. DDR5 Memory Performance For Intel Core i5-12600K Alder Lake On Linux

    Given current memory pricing and extremely limited availability of DDR5 memory modules, many Phoronix readers have been requesting DDR4 vs. DDR5 memory benchmarks for Alder Lake on Linux. After picking up a DDR4 Z690 motherboard, here are some reference benchmarks between DDR4 and DDR5 when testing with the Core i5 12600K on Ubuntu Linux in a variety of real-world workloads.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30706

  • #2
    Not worth it at all at the moment...
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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    • #3
      Not gonna lie, the only thing about DDR5 that gets me excited are the potential performance improvements that iGPUs will get. Most of that excitement is because Ram+MB+APU will probably cost cheaper or close to the price of a Worth-A-Shit-GPU. Basically, if the friggin Steam Deck APU ends up doing what my 4GB RX 580 does, we'll call it enhanced medium 1080p60, then I know I'll be upgrading sooner than later. If not, eh, I'm happy with 3600 DDR4 bumped up to 3800. It's fast enough for my end-user needs.
      Last edited by skeevy420; 23 November 2021, 10:38 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
        Not worth it at all at the moment...
        Same trend as seen with the upgrade to DDR4 and DDR3. Initial pricing is high for a marginal performance improvement. Consumers have no reason to select DDR5 until it becomes the price/performance value option, probably in another year or two.

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        • #5
          At least 2 generations of processors from both AMD and Intel, yes excluding 12th gen before DDR5 really means anything.

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          • #6
            2% between DDR5-4400 and readily available DDR4-3600... Not exactly rousing.

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            • #7
              The DDR5 used in this benchmark was the slow 4400. There is also DDR5-4800 and DDR5-6400 which are faster. Hopefully later even faster DDR5 variants will be announced.

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              • #8
                It is really funny when people don't really read the same graphs i am reading. The performance difference is significant, even at 4400mhz which is a lot slower than the officially supported 4800mhz. It is almost the equivalent of a new architecture IPC gains (and i am pretty sure as the schedulers improve we are going to see much higher gains from DDR5). Hardly something to scoff at. Someone who is buying a brand new cpu which its cheapest model currently costs higher than 300 euros and also needs to use an expensive new motherboard, really has no reason to cheap out on DDR5, if it is in stock. It is not like overclocked DDR4 is cheap. Try getting DDR4 at higher than 3600mhz and see how much you need to pay. If you are into getting an Alder Lake NOW, you are among the people who want the best performance and don't care about pricing very much, that means you should get DDR5.

                Otherwise, if you care about price vs performance, Rocket Lake is simply put the best desktop processor line currently. AMD cpus at the moment are priced way higher than they should be. Rocket Lake pricing especially for the i5s is great and you can get affordable motherboards and DDR4 for a cheap system that is not that far behind in performance from the latest and greatest.

                So, as i correctly said in another thread, right NOW, if you are going Alder Lake, get DDR5, if you want DDR4, get Rocket Lake. Things will change in the coming months with cheaper mobos for Alder Lake, cheaper CPU models, and more affordable DDR5.

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                • #9
                  Correct me if I'm wrong, I may not have understood what I was reading but doesn't all DDR 5 come with ECC built in? Or some form of ECC? Really a fan of the technology especially as we put more and more RAM into systems like laptops. Almost all my RAM at work is ECC DDR 4 and DDR 3.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                    The DDR5 used in this benchmark was the slow 4400. There is also DDR5-4800 and DDR5-6400 which are faster. Hopefully later even faster DDR5 variants will be announced.
                    It will be. New memory always starts at around the same MT's as the previous gen, and climbs from there. These are the officially supported JEDEC speeds over each generation. Of course the aftermarket will push the limits a bit more as well:

                    DDR2 introduced at 400, eventually climbing to 1066.
                    DDR3 introduced at 1066, eventually climbing to 2166.
                    DDR4 introduced at 1600, eventually climbing to 3200.
                    DDR5 introduced at 4400, eventually climbing to ????.

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