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Proton 5.13-5 Now Available With Cyberpunk 2077 Fixes, Microsoft Flight Simulator VR

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  • Proton 5.13-5 Now Available With Cyberpunk 2077 Fixes, Microsoft Flight Simulator VR

    Phoronix: Proton 5.13-5 Now Available With Cyberpunk 2077 Fixes, Microsoft Flight Simulator VR

    After experimental builds and the recent release candidates, Valve's Proton 5.13-5 is now available as the latest version of this Wine downstream for powering Steam Play for running Windows games on Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Proton-5.13-5

  • #2
    Wow, I'll have to try this. I have to switch my hard drive whenever I want to play Cyberpunk, it's pretty much a pain. With DSLL, at 4k I can get as much as 39 fps. It it can maintain over 30 fps, I'll switch.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
      Wow, I'll have to try this. I have to switch my hard drive whenever I want to play Cyberpunk, it's pretty much a pain. With DSLL, at 4k I can get as much as 39 fps. It it can maintain over 30 fps, I'll switch.
      I feel your pain. My motherboard has this crappy 3 disk drive limitation so I swap out OS drives and do the same thing for the same game.

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      • #4
        I have to wonder how much of a threat proton is to linux port publishers.

        An element of proton that is understated is multiplayer compatibility. I've encountered a situation with 5+ year old games where inter-platform compatibility degrades due to inattention by the linux port team. There will be a third-party publisher for the linux port, and if the main publisher and port publisher do not provide equal level of updates, the end result is loss of multiplayer compatibility. The thing is, a few years after release, success of proton is likely. I bought the port of Borderlands 2, but deleted it because the proton version is the only way to play with friends.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by extremesquared View Post
          I have to wonder how much of a threat proton is to linux port publishers.
          I'd say that it's already happening. Market share is still so small, that the publishers that decide to harbor the cost of a native Linux port do it as an afterthought, and more often than not don't want to pay the cost of maintaining it. (Cue the lead programmer trying to convince management that a native port is a good idea). Proton should only accelerate the trend.

          It should be much easier and cost-effective for a developer to create a testing environment with Proton, treat it like another 'Windows variant', and support that, instead of a native port. It that results in more and more games running well on Linux, we will be in a much better situation than we were with Steam Play and the few native ports that trickled down in Steam.

          Personally, as soon as we have the API support to run anti-cheat solutions well, for online games, then all my gaming needs are well served in a Linux stack. I couldn't care less if there is a layer there or not. Chances are that the API support of the layer will be more stable than any undelying FOSS stack, in the case of a native port.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
            With DSLL, at 4k I can get as much as 39 fps. It it can maintain over 30 fps, I'll switch.
            wouldn't it be better to maintain over 120 fps in fullhd?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cmakeshift View Post

              I'd say that it's already happening. Market share is still so small, that the publishers that decide to harbor the cost of a native Linux port do it as an afterthought, and more often than not don't want to pay the cost of maintaining it. (Cue the lead programmer trying to convince management that a native port is a good idea). Proton should only accelerate the trend.

              It should be much easier and cost-effective for a developer to create a testing environment with Proton, treat it like another 'Windows variant', and support that, instead of a native port. It that results in more and more games running well on Linux, we will be in a much better situation than we were with Steam Play and the few native ports that trickled down in Steam.

              Personally, as soon as we have the API support to run anti-cheat solutions well, for online games, then all my gaming needs are well served in a Linux stack. I couldn't care less if there is a layer there or not. Chances are that the API support of the layer will be more stable than any undelying FOSS stack, in the case of a native port.
              This 100%. There's no reason for porting to native linux when you can just port to windows and either hope for proton to work or give that extra 5% attention to it and make it work yourself for the < 1% market share. Doing anything else would be counter-business.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cmakeshift View Post

                I'd say that it's already happening. Market share is still so small, that the publishers that decide to harbor the cost of a native Linux port do it as an afterthought, and more often than not don't want to pay the cost of maintaining it. (Cue the lead programmer trying to convince management that a native port is a good idea). Proton should only accelerate the trend.

                It should be much easier and cost-effective for a developer to create a testing environment with Proton, treat it like another 'Windows variant', and support that, instead of a native port. It that results in more and more games running well on Linux, we will be in a much better situation than we were with Steam Play and the few native ports that trickled down in Steam.

                Personally, as soon as we have the API support to run anti-cheat solutions well, for online games, then all my gaming needs are well served in a Linux stack. I couldn't care less if there is a layer there or not. Chances are that the API support of the layer will be more stable than any undelying FOSS stack, in the case of a native port.
                I am with you. Before we can really expect native ports we need a notable userbase. We don't get that userbase if there is nothing for them to play. So we need to do anything we can to get the userbase first. The rest will come after.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                  wouldn't it be better to maintain over 120 fps in fullhd?
                  I don't think the game can even do this in many areas where it will tank fps. But if you drive around in the desert, sure 120fps fullhd should be possible... Game needs allot of patches before I return to it, likely take another look at it in 2022 (yes I did finish most the content).

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                  • #10
                    Nothing beats Linux native, Proton creates lag and a performance hit, glad developers are starting to add fixes to their games for proton though e.g. warframe

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