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Unity 2019.1 Beta Deprecates Linux x86, Offers Up Many Vulkan & Linux Improvements

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  • #21
    Originally posted by przmk View Post

    What documentation do you need ? You download the binary and you're good to go.
    You don't need to spend an hour compiling UE4 (that works somewhat good only on the supported Ubuntu).

    Unity gets lots of money from their licences, has the biggest gamedev community there is, doesn't show any signs of declining at all, has C# instead of C++.
    Flash was replaced by a better solution (HTML5+ JS) and I fail to see how it's similar to Unity since it's thriving.

    I don't even like Unity, but it's pretty clear that it's here to stay for a long time.


    Also, you're just being an elitist like plenty of other toxic Linux users, this is my last post here since I don't want to bother wasting my time.
    I actually think kpedersen made some good points, and isn't really being elitist, maybe a bit snobby but thats really it. I too think Unity is going to be around for a while, and I think both companies need to get their shit together.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by przmk View Post
      What documentation do you need ?
      Haha. Typical Unity user. Just keep fiddling until it magically works. And when it doesn't, just blame the tools rather than RTFM.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by SaucyJack View Post
        UE4 has no Linux support.
        Haven't we covered this?
        Check out this page.

        https://docs.unrealengine.com/en-us/...UnrealWorkflow

        Why would Epic spend a large amount of money and time writing Linux documentation if it doesn't support Linux?

        And where is the similar Linux specific documentation for Unity? It doesn't exist because Unity is a toy and kids playing with toys don't use Linux
        Last edited by kpedersen; 01-31-2019, 01:56 PM.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Babuloseo View Post

          I actually think kpedersen made some good points, and isn't really being elitist, maybe a bit snobby but thats really it.
          And I do actually apologise for that!

          My day to day work sees me having to get a lot of failed projects back on track and I have identitfied Unity (or most likely the inexperienced developers that are attracted to Unity) as the number one cause for a project to fall apart. So yes, I am grumpy and possibly on the brink of burnout XD.

          Originally whilst contracting I would see that a project was hanging on Unity and I would just turn it down without a second thought, but I actually started to realise that there was good money coming in as a "damage control" consultant and putting in the same old fixes. It does get painfull having to babysit the original developers though, possibly the most unfulfilling part of the job having to almost teach them the absolute sodding basics and they are so increadibly closed minded and naive; completely unsuitable to be software developers.

          And the worst thing is, this all just used to be Adobe Flash, they made the same old stupid choices. Once Unity dies, there will be something else for the pretenders to use. It is just an endless cycle! Game developers are the most retarded breed of software developer these days. Which is sad because they used to be awesome.
          Last edited by kpedersen; 01-31-2019, 01:52 PM.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

            And I do actually apologies for that!

            My day to day work sees me having to get a lot of failed projects back on track and I have identitfied Unity (or most likely the inexperienced developers) as a number one cause for a project to fall apart. So yes, I am grumpy and possibly on the brink of burnout XD.
            I don't blame you honestly, everyone in the Linux community or for people that have been around for a while should have a distaste of anything with the name "Unity", I strongly resent Canonical for the shit they pulled and held back Linux desktop progression for a while. I really like the documentation that Unreal has, especially since I am a QtCreator user and other related Qt projects. The only thing that bothers me is that to get an Unreal binary, without getting a license or whatever you mentioned is that I have to compile Unreal, and it takes a while...and I think going on MacOS/Windows and installing it might be faster. Not all of us have enough ram/cpu resources or the ability to get a license to get a build of a build server...

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            • #26
              Godot? Godot! Godot!!? Godot!!!

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Babuloseo View Post
                I strongly resent Canonical for the shit they pulled and held back Linux desktop progression for a while.
                Haha yeah, Canonical calling their DE Unity is quite ironic (is that name just cursed?). At one point I was going to just create a browser plugin that blocked off any page containing the word "Unity" for my own sanity

                Originally posted by Babuloseo View Post
                I have to compile Unreal, and it takes a while...
                Compiling takes some time (2 days on my Thinkpad, I have to limit the CPU so it doesn't overheat) but you only need to do it once and then you can deploy it on all of your workstations. I don't really see that as much of an issue to be honest. IMO Game development shouldn't be like playing games where you should expect everything to be an immeidiate thrill. Planning development tools and things for projects should be expected surely.

                Not to mention, Linux doesn't work the same way as Windows, having a single library that is shared between all programs creates complexities that makes it too volatile for a binary to support. glibc versioning differences is the big one but sometimes even things like SDL or libpng being a version out can render a binary useless. By compiling the binary specifically on that deployment ensures that it links against that exact same version. I actually find this more deterministic and stable.

                One example is try to download the oldest Unity binary for Linux you can find. Not only is it for an old version of Ubuntu but if you try to run it on Debian 9, it does not work without some non-trivial work. This is pretty crap but in this case not Unity's fault. This one is purely down to the joys of how Linux is designed.

                For my own personal use, I actually use the master revision of UE4 straight from git. I like being able to play with the latest stuff that same day it gets committed rather than wait (sometimes up to a month!). This is something you will never get with Unity. They are not community players, they see their users as cattle to be milked. Most of their budget goes on their marketing and is a little sickening.
                I even have insight that they do creepy things like employ evangelists to interact with well known game development forums to push their agenda. I suppose this kind of behaviour has been the only way they could compete with the percieved coolness of a "AAA branded" games development studio like Epic. Though I am a little surprised that the kids fell for it.
                Last edited by kpedersen; 01-31-2019, 02:19 PM.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by przmk View Post

                  Whas C# instead of C++.
                  That's a minus, not a plus.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by shmerl View Post

                    That's a minus, not a plus.
                    Yep, its also wrong. Unity's engine is written in C++ and so is the old Mono .NET VM that the C# scripts needs to work. It is extremely dependent on C++.

                    But I suppose a Unity user will never understand why native languages such as C++ still hold the crown when it comes to game development.

                    Lets hope he never needs to step outside his scripting sandbox and use (god forbid!) native code as part of a project requirement set by the client. Otherwise I suppose thats another project for me to pick up :/
                    Last edited by kpedersen; 01-31-2019, 02:48 PM.

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                    • #30
                      Good. Save time and memory.

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