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Linux Sysctl Cleaning To Eventually Erase ~64 Bytes Of Bloat Per Array

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  • Linux Sysctl Cleaning To Eventually Erase ~64 Bytes Of Bloat Per Array

    Phoronix: Linux Sysctl Cleaning To Eventually Erase ~64 Bytes Of Bloat Per Array

    Some code cleaning within the sysctl space of the Linux kernel will eventually eliminate around 64 bytes of bloat per array within the kernel where a sentinel can be removed...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    64 bytes per array
    That's quite the sentinel

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    • #3
      About what amount of sysctl arrays are we talking here, typically?

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      • #4
        Thank God... I was really suffocating without my 64 bytes!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MastaG View Post
          Thank God... I was really suffocating without my 64 bytes!
          If you have a few thousand of them, it's already a few hundred kilobytes. Measurable in IoT or for projects like OpenWrt.
          Last edited by aviallon; 30 August 2023, 10:42 AM. Reason: Clarify last sentence

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aviallon View Post

            If you have a few thousand of them, it's already a few hundred kilobytes. Measurable of iot.
            At the expense of "slowing down the moves of kernel/sysctl.c arrays" and "truly painful code refactoring". I'd gladly sacrifice a few hundred KB of memory to use more mature, faster, less error-prone code. Extra memory isn't worth much if the kernel crashes.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Joe2021 View Post
              About what amount of sysctl arrays are we talking here, typically?
              On my computer it would save 141 kB:
              $ sudo sysctl -a | wc -l
              2259
              $ echo "2259*64/1024" | bc
              141

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              • #8
                Jakobson Based on your math above:

                $ sudo sysctl -a | wc -l
                2038
                $ echo "2038*64/1024" | bc
                ‚Äč127

                A full 127Kb on my current machine. I demand to have my 127kb on 128Gb of mem back!

                (thanks for putting the quick math together, I was curious if this was really something to look at... its not if this math is correct)

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                • #9
                  Please stop making fun of cleanup improvements. Even small, when multiplied by millions, they end up huge.
                  Even if it was 1 Byte per array, that would be welcome.

                  I am so fed up with bloat in sofwares that I give whatever I get a warm welcome nowadays.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rmfx View Post
                    Please stop making fun of cleanup improvements. Even small, when multiplied by millions, they end up huge.
                    Even if it was 1 Byte per array, that would be welcome.

                    I am so fed up with bloat in sofwares that I give whatever I get a warm welcome nowadays.
                    It's perfectly fine to make light of this... it was published as a news worthy item and therefor subject to public discourse. Really super tiny items when multiplied by large numbers are still really tiny numbers.

                    That said, code cleanup is always a good thing! It just may not all be "news worthy".

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