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  • Samsung 980 NVMe SSD Linux Performance

    Phoronix: Samsung 980 NVMe SSD Linux Performance

    Earlier this month Samsung announced the 980 (non-PRO) NVMe solid-state driver offering a combination of speed and affordability for consumers. Many Linux readers have been curious about this Samsung 980 DRAM-less SSD so here are some initial benchmarks of it. Overall, it's been working out well under Linux.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30058

  • #2
    The endurance rating of consumer SSD's has been dropping for years, to where the cells are rated for only a few hundred write cycles. It's pretty bad. IMO you get more bang for your buck with used enterprise equipment. Think intel S3700 and S3610 and Samsung SM863a and PM863a, which have several Petabytes of write endurance, compared to a mere few hundred TB for many consumer models. I'm using SATA myself, but I imagine the same trend holds true for NVMe storage devices.
    Last edited by torsionbar28; 26 March 2021, 01:11 PM.

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    • #3
      This is a great advertisement for the WD SN850. I didn't realize Samsung made such sad trash. I mean, they make their own memory, controllers, and flash. How do you fuck that up?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ThoreauHD View Post
        This is a great advertisement for the WD SN850. I didn't realize Samsung made such sad trash. I mean, they make their own memory, controllers, and flash. How do you fuck that up?
        The industry term for this is "cost optimized". In other words, it's a race to the bottom. Top priority is how cheaply it can be manufactured. Performance is somewhere lower down the priority list, and endurance rating is somewhere below that. This is K-mart tier hardware.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
          The endurance rating of consumer SSD's has been dropping for years, to where the cells are rated for only a few hundred write cycles. It's pretty bad. IMO you get more bang for your buck with used enterprise equipment. Think intel S3700 and S3610 and Samsung SM863a and PM863a, which have several Petabytes of write endurance, compared to a mere few hundred TB for many consumer models. I'm using SATA myself, but I imagine the same trend holds true for NVMe storage devices.
          totally agreed with you.

          Samsung 980 Pro 2 TB : around 400€ ex tva DWPD : 0,33 (and write sucks)

          I have bought recently 6,4TB DC nvme intel P6410 and micron nvme 92XXX drive (DWPD 3), around 1500€ ex tva



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          • #6
            Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
            The endurance rating of consumer SSD's has been dropping for years, to where the cells are rated for only a few hundred write cycles. It's pretty bad. IMO you get more bang for your buck with used enterprise equipment. Think intel S3700 and S3610 and Samsung SM863a and PM863a, which have several Petabytes of write endurance, compared to a mere few hundred TB for many consumer models. I'm using SATA myself, but I imagine the same trend holds true for NVMe storage devices.
            Agreed. And I am still scared of buying an SSD, feeling that it will fail all of a sudden (unlike HDD which fails gradually).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

              Agreed. And I am still scared of buying an SSD, feeling that it will fail all of a sudden (unlike HDD which fails gradually).
              Unfortunately, HDDs at the consumer level started the race to the bottom years ago, and I've had more than one that failed suddenly, despite the SMART status being OK until one day it wasn't. And yes, I've had a couple of SATA SSDs which failed fairly suddenly.

              Having backups is good, but replacing a single drive on a desktop machine can still be a pain.

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              • #8
                I have had lots of HDDs fail over the years and had to resort to things like the freezer trick or swapping out the plates to a working drive (not for the faint of heart!) but have done very well with SSDs for a long time now. Anyway, one of SATA's purposes is to be able to retrieve data in the event of a drive failure.

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                • #9
                  The key to SSDs lasting is not filling them all the way up....if your SSD is at under 75% full it should last plenty long, if you get over that you are reducing the lifespan of the SSD even on models that are have built in over provisioning as there are fewer cells to spread the load over.

                  If you plan on having 200GB of data, don't buy a 256... buy the 512 etc...
                  Last edited by cb88; 26 March 2021, 03:52 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Wow, this is very informative. I wasn't aware that the Samsung 9x0 was so garbage compared to the WD.

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