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Debian 10.9 Released With FWUPD SBAT Support, Bug Fixes

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  • #11
    linuxgeex Makes sense with the different brand. Previosly I thought it would be best when both (all) devices where the same in RAID configurations.

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    • #12
      I tried updating all day and am getting the following error. "The repository 'http://deb.debian.org/debian buster/updates Release' does not have a Release file."
      I tried several different mirrors all with the same error.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by cliff View Post
        I tried updating all day and am getting the following error. "The repository 'http://deb.debian.org/debian buster/updates Release' does not have a Release file."
        I tried several different mirrors all with the same error.
        I only needed one look to tell that the URL is completely wrong.

        And people talk about using Linux like some badge of honor to show that they are more computer literate than Windows and macOS users.
        Last edited by Sonadow; 28 March 2021, 10:50 PM.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

          I only needed one look to tell that the URL is completely wrong.

          And people talk about using Linux like some badge of honor to show that they are more computer literate than Windows and macOS users.
          Well, that's the weird thing it worked yesterday and now it doesn't. I had not made any changes to my source list. I'm not really into badges or ego just trying to solve a puzzle. Thanks.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by linuxgeex View Post

            It becomes an easy physical denial of service vector, not all firmwares are super reliable with detecting USB storage, and many thumb drives have unpredictable power-on delays ( they run consistency checks at power on and many have weak resources for that purpose ) which contribute to the likelihood of not being detected.

            If you're just talking about a personal use PC where you can tolerate detection failure at boot time then yeah you can just reset and cross your fingers for the second startup.

            If you care about uptime, ie your server is in a colo, you're really best off booting from PCIe SSDs, which is why all modern server boards are shipping with M.2 PCIe sockets. If it has 2 slots, put a different brand in each slot to mitigate the risk of simultaneous failure due to identical firmware bugs. Same thing if you have a RAID1 boot volume across 2 SAS/SATA SSDs - pick two different brands for the boot RAID pair.
            Fair play. I tend to stick to a few USB sticks; I've got a pair of Corsair Flash GTRs which I use for bootable ISOs etc - had them since about a month after they launched, they fairly regularly get written to when I want to try out a new distro (or am setting up a new box) and they're still going strong (10 years or so, I think?). Never had a board refuse to read them yet... except a bad Windows 10 image, which would boot but wouldn't find my NVMe drive (on three different boxes!) unless I "burned" the USB image using the Windows 10 Update Assistant.

            Thanks for explaining your thinking.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by lucrus View Post

              You can use it right now:

              https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/w...amd64/iso-dvd/

              Still testing, but it works out of the box for most users. I'm using it with no issues at all.
              I am using the following url to download non-free hybrid iso:

              https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/u...64/iso-hybrid/

              Works great on all of our machines, which, by the way, have all upgraded to Ryzen 4700u. You can use the hybrid iso to burn a bootable liveUSB. Or better, make a persistent liveusb.

              We have been Ubuntu users since 2008~9, but have switched to Debian 11 for almost three months now. We do have Ubuntu 20.04.2 in one of our partitions just in case, but never had to boot into the Ubuntu partition, except for the routine system upgrades and refreshing the backups.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by baka0815 View Post
                linuxgeex Makes sense with the different brand. Previosly I thought it would be best when both (all) devices where the same in RAID configurations.
                That is true except where avoiding SPOF. Reliability engineering has different best practices than performance engineering.

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