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Debian 10.9 Released With FWUPD SBAT Support, Bug Fixes

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  • linuxgeex
    replied
    Originally posted by baka0815 View Post
    linuxgeex Makes sense with the different brand. Previosly I thought it would be best when both (all) devices where the same in RAID configurations.
    That is true except where avoiding SPOF. Reliability engineering has different best practices than performance engineering.

    Leave a comment:


  • ping-wu
    replied
    Originally posted by lucrus View Post

    You can use it right now:



    Still testing, but it works out of the box for most users. I'm using it with no issues at all.
    I am using the following url to download non-free hybrid iso:



    Works great on all of our machines, which, by the way, have all upgraded to Ryzen 4700u. You can use the hybrid iso to burn a bootable liveUSB. Or better, make a persistent liveusb.

    We have been Ubuntu users since 2008~9, but have switched to Debian 11 for almost three months now. We do have Ubuntu 20.04.2 in one of our partitions just in case, but never had to boot into the Ubuntu partition, except for the routine system upgrades and refreshing the backups.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by linuxgeex View Post

    It becomes an easy physical denial of service vector, not all firmwares are super reliable with detecting USB storage, and many thumb drives have unpredictable power-on delays ( they run consistency checks at power on and many have weak resources for that purpose ) which contribute to the likelihood of not being detected.

    If you're just talking about a personal use PC where you can tolerate detection failure at boot time then yeah you can just reset and cross your fingers for the second startup.

    If you care about uptime, ie your server is in a colo, you're really best off booting from PCIe SSDs, which is why all modern server boards are shipping with M.2 PCIe sockets. If it has 2 slots, put a different brand in each slot to mitigate the risk of simultaneous failure due to identical firmware bugs. Same thing if you have a RAID1 boot volume across 2 SAS/SATA SSDs - pick two different brands for the boot RAID pair.
    Fair play. I tend to stick to a few USB sticks; I've got a pair of Corsair Flash GTRs which I use for bootable ISOs etc - had them since about a month after they launched, they fairly regularly get written to when I want to try out a new distro (or am setting up a new box) and they're still going strong (10 years or so, I think?). Never had a board refuse to read them yet... except a bad Windows 10 image, which would boot but wouldn't find my NVMe drive (on three different boxes!) unless I "burned" the USB image using the Windows 10 Update Assistant.

    Thanks for explaining your thinking.

    Leave a comment:


  • cliff
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

    I only needed one look to tell that the URL is completely wrong.

    And people talk about using Linux like some badge of honor to show that they are more computer literate than Windows and macOS users.
    Well, that's the weird thing it worked yesterday and now it doesn't. I had not made any changes to my source list. I'm not really into badges or ego just trying to solve a puzzle. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by cliff View Post
    I tried updating all day and am getting the following error. "The repository 'http://deb.debian.org/debian buster/updates Release' does not have a Release file."
    I tried several different mirrors all with the same error.
    I only needed one look to tell that the URL is completely wrong.

    And people talk about using Linux like some badge of honor to show that they are more computer literate than Windows and macOS users.
    Last edited by Sonadow; 28 March 2021, 10:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • cliff
    replied
    I tried updating all day and am getting the following error. "The repository 'http://deb.debian.org/debian buster/updates Release' does not have a Release file."
    I tried several different mirrors all with the same error.

    Leave a comment:


  • baka0815
    replied
    linuxgeex Makes sense with the different brand. Previosly I thought it would be best when both (all) devices where the same in RAID configurations.

    Leave a comment:


  • linuxgeex
    replied
    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
    Would running the EFI partition off a USB stick serve purpose? That would be easier to clone to keep a spare safe.
    It becomes an easy physical denial of service vector, not all firmwares are super reliable with detecting USB storage, and many thumb drives have unpredictable power-on delays ( they run consistency checks at power on and many have weak resources for that purpose ) which contribute to the likelihood of not being detected.

    If you're just talking about a personal use PC where you can tolerate detection failure at boot time then yeah you can just reset and cross your fingers for the second startup.

    If you care about uptime, ie your server is in a colo, you're really best off booting from PCIe SSDs, which is why all modern server boards are shipping with M.2 PCIe sockets. If it has 2 slots, put a different brand in each slot to mitigate the risk of simultaneous failure due to identical firmware bugs. Same thing if you have a RAID1 boot volume across 2 SAS/SATA SSDs - pick two different brands for the boot RAID pair.

    Last edited by linuxgeex; 28 March 2021, 09:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • linuxgeex
    replied
    phoronix what exactly about post #8 is leading to it being flagged as potential spam? All I did was talk about OS boot volume filesystem choice. No external links. No mention of anything that could be implied as commercial enticement. Time to reset your bayesian filter, it's obviously been poisoned to the point of being pathological.

    Leave a comment:


  • linuxgeex
    replied
    Originally posted by waxhead View Post

    I never looked to deep into the difference between the legacy BIOS and UEFI implementations. I still don't use UEFI at all. What I think is a general weakness with these systems is the use of FAT32 as a system partition. Do you know if it is possible (in Debian) to make a UEFI boot partition on multiple disks just as you would install GRUB on multiple disks to maintain redundancy in case a disk or two goes kebab?
    You can RAID your boot volume and/or you can set up the UEFI to fall back to a secondary/tertiary boot volume in case of failure of the primary/seconary.

    FAT is KISS and being KISS isn't a weak link. At boot time KISS is a strength. UEFI will happily use a fat16 boot volume and I always reformat it from fat32 to fat16 because I like it even more KISS. TBH I would be happy if UEFI instead moved to using a tar archive as the boot volume filesystem. Tar has no journalling, no fsck... it doesn't need it. It's set and forget, not a high-throughput transactional data store.

    To have the benefits of ext4 for a UEFI boot volume you'd need an implementation of ext4 and fsck.ext4 in the mobo firmware. That would bloat the firmware to a point that someone could hide a complete operating system in the space of the ext4 driver if it were unused, thus leaving more room for advanced persistent threat malware written to the firmware. It also means a larger flash area which increases the BOM and elevates the cost of all motherboards. It also means that some OS developers will mistakenly assume it's more resilient, when actually it adds tons more structures which need to be in a consistent state. It also increases the minimum size of a boot volume, which then takes UEFI off the table as a boot option for smaller embedded products. Fat16 on the other hand only has a few kilobytes of required consistent structure. If a block dies on your ext4 boot volume it is more likely to fail than a fat16 boot volume, period. But if the volume is signed, a corrupt block will cause failover to a healthy volume regardless of the chosen filesystem. :-) So you may as well use the one with the lowest cost.
    Last edited by linuxgeex; 28 March 2021, 09:09 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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