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Debian 11 "Bullseye" Cycle Prepares To Begin Long Journey

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  • Debian 11 "Bullseye" Cycle Prepares To Begin Long Journey

    Phoronix: Debian 11 "Bullseye" Cycle Prepares To Begin Long Journey

    Now that Debian 10 "Buster" shipped, Debian developers are preparing already to kickoff the Debian 11 "Bullseye" development and begin with uploading new packages for this next major release of Debian GNU/Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ye-Cycle-Start

  • #2
    I assume that software that will be in Debian 11 is already outdated.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
      I assume that software that will be in Debian 11 is already outdated.
      Your post number 420 and it shows because you are clearly high.

      Jokes aside, software in Debian testing is usually not more than ~10 days after upstream releases. It's only after release that it starts ageing, and even then it still gets timely security updates and bug fixes.

      Want to run Debian with up to date packages? No problem, just run testing or unstable. They are basically like any other rolling distribution.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
        I assume that software that will be in Debian 11 is already outdated.
        You sound like that debianxfce troll: "My use case is the only one that exists! Screw server-focused distros/versions! They're a waste of time!"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DanL View Post

          You sound like that debianxfce troll: "My use case is the only one that exists! Screw server-focused distros/versions! They're a waste of time!"
          First of all, I really miss him here, and the forum feels dead without him. Also, Debian tries to be "universal", not a server distro.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Brisse View Post

            Your post number 420 and it shows because you are clearly high.

            Jokes aside, software in Debian testing is usually not more than ~10 days after upstream releases. It's only after release that it starts ageing, and even then it still gets timely security updates and bug fixes.

            Want to run Debian with up to date packages? No problem, just run testing or unstable. They are basically like any other rolling distribution.
            I'm not dense enough to use Debian for anything. It doesn't have as much packages as Arch, it has it's own silly free software definition I don't agree with (GNU FDL with invariant sections is fine), alternatives are garbage, the package manager is clunky, and the install process is so bad you're better off without an installer.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post

              I'm not dense enough to use Debian for anything. It doesn't have as much packages as Arch, it has it's own silly free software definition I don't agree with (GNU FDL with invariant sections is fine), alternatives are garbage, the package manager is clunky, and the install process is so bad you're better off without an installer.
              You must be really crazy or something. Debian is super easy to install and package manager works very well and it's fast. I use Fedora as my primary OS and Debian as secondary. Both are like one million times better than Arch which is crap btw.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
                First of all, I really miss him here. the forum feels dead without him.
                So you like repetitive flamewars and lots of noise on your signal? There is something wrong with you.

                Also, Debian tries to be "universal", not a server distro.
                The stable releases cater to server users and others who like minimal package churn. If you feel it is "outdated", then you just don't understand that (and probably never will).

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                • #9
                  I'm not a linux guru, even by a long shot. Many years ago, I was fed up with the ethics of ms and wanted to switch to something interesting, like linux. Back then it was a huge learning curve and full of gurus that hat little time or patience for noobs..

                  A few years ago, I tried a number of linux flavours, all based on ubuntu. I finally settled on mint as it worked well, even with an aging laptop. I find however, not being the usual blinkered windoze guy, that I'm not satisfied with a vanilla ubuntu desktop and spend more time than anything in the terminal.

                  Ok, linux isn't exactly a games machine, but 32bit support covers more than "just games". Taking it away hurts users that want/need it. Bad move ubuntu..

                  Being on mint, theres a debian edition and at my level, its probably a better choice (for me) to progress with linux and avoid ubuntu's mess.

                  Back to my thoughts on debian, maybe this is just the time to push this distro. Debian could do well from ubuntu's poor decisions..

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                  • #10
                    Lol. These recent Debian arguments are all based on one's personal view of what "Stable" means.

                    For some it's the minimal package churn with security updates with minimal changes, for other's it's keeping packages up-to-date as they're released by their developer(s), and for others it could be using a compromise distribution like Manjaro where you roll along at a slower pace so there's more package testing involved.

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