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PipeWire Is In Increasingly Great Shape - Ready For More User Testing

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  • PipeWire Is In Increasingly Great Shape - Ready For More User Testing

    Phoronix: PipeWire Is In Increasingly Great Shape - Ready For More User Testing

    PipeWire as the Red Hat led project for better audio/video stream management server on the Linux desktop is getting into increasingly great shape. This forward-looking solution that handles PulseAudio/JACK use-cases as well as pleasant integration with the likes of Wayland and Flatpak is ready to take on more user testing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...re-Summer-2020

  • #2
    JACK sink? Does this mean being able to output PipeWire to JACK?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      JACK sink? Does this mean being able to output PipeWire to JACK?
      Assumably other way around.

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      • #4
        How will we use PipeWire's video backend? Will there be a dropdown box in video players' GUI to choose among vaapi/vdpau/pipewire?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cl333r View Post
          How will we use PipeWire's video backend? Will there be a dropdown box in video players' GUI to choose among vaapi/vdpau/pipewire?
          I dont know much about this but it seems that pipewire might be at a higher level than vaapi/vdpau. Whilst third party video players may give that as an option, I suspect the goal is for the video players to use pipewire and pipewire to be configured tochoose the right backend

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          • #6
            I have great hope for PipeWire but after spending a few days dedicated to trying to get it to work on Arch recently I had to surrender to defeat. It's very much in the baby steps phase right now, and wants Wayland Gnome very, very, badly. And good god, I can't run things like Gnome and KDE, they just drive me up the wall with all their spinny bleepy things and the ludicrous complexity demanded to do the simplest of things. For example, I was never even able to create a simple, unified, customized, cascading menu on either one.

            However I have a great bias towards the simple, direct, and efficient. And realize many people absolutely love Gnome and KDE, and consider things like XFCE stone age technology

            Which of course is one of the wonderful things about Linux. If you have the interest and patience to learn you can literally make it anything you want.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by muncrief View Post
              For example, I was never even able to create a simple, unified, customized, cascading menu on either one.
              In what context? ...and define "simple. unified, customized, cascading".

              ...because, for the main launcher menu, in KDE, you can get a "cascading" launcher menu by choosing Unlock Widgets from the panel menu, then right-clicking the default launcher and choosing Alternatives, then choosing "Application Menu". (ie. It's a different widget. "Alternatives" is an easy way to swap between widgets which serve the same role without manually deleting one then adding the other.)

              Then, you can right-click it and choose "Application Menu Settings..." to adjust "unified" and "simple".

              Finally, you can right-click and choose "Edit Applications..." and you'll get a menu editor for "customized".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                Which of course is one of the wonderful things about Linux. If you have the interest and patience to learn you can literally make it anything you want.
                Amen to that.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
                  ...because, for the main launcher menu, in KDE, you can get a "cascading" launcher menu by choosing Unlock Widgets from the panel menu, then right-clicking the default launcher and choosing Alternatives, then choosing "Application Menu". (ie. It's a different widget. "Alternatives" is an easy way to swap between widgets which serve the same role without manually deleting one then adding the other.)
                  I call that "Step 1" after a fresh KDE install. Never been much of a fan of those smart start menus.

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                  • #10
                    I am quite keen on seeing at least some work on remote computing (not everything is a consumer tablet after all!)

                    I do have a few queries I don't know if anyone has any answers to or knowledge about. The details seem to be fairly light and the development is still very early?

                    1) Is this only a Gnome 3 feature or will it be possible to integrate with popular compositors like Sway and Weston?
                    2) Can this work on a headless server (with no GPU)?
                    3) Can this allow 5 users to each run their own desktop session simultaneously?
                    4) Can this allow me to spawn a 9999x9999 resolution session and connect to it?

                    Hopefully all of these are a 'yes'. Then we might finally have a suitable alternative to the X11 based Xvnc.

                    Originally posted by 144Hz
                    So the usual stuff. Red Hat’s desktop team doing 99% of the work.
                    You kind of have to expect that when communities allow commercial companies to take control and "govern" the direction of projects
                    Last edited by kpedersen; 09-04-2020, 03:10 PM.

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