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  • FreeNAS 11.0 Released

    Phoronix: FreeNAS 11.0 Released

    FreeNAS 11.0 is now officially available, the network attached storage (NAS) centered operating system powered by FreeBSD...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-11.0-Released

  • #2
    Interesting to note that they skipped FreeNAS 10 after the FreeNAS Corral disaster.
    From what I can tell, FreeNAS 11 is essentially FreeNAS 9.10 rebased onto FreeBSD 11, with some of the Bhyve and S3-compatibility features cherry-picked from Corral.
    That recipe however sounds great to me, and I will be downloading it to check it out.

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    • #3
      I'm too lazy to look it up, but FreeNAS had a hard time going from 7 to 8, or 8 to 9. Took months and thousands of man/hours to regroup even a tiny fraction of all the extended functionalities they could offer. So, I wouldn't be surprised that they are going to avoid that drama again.

      FreeNAS is an actual business, with actual clients, that expect some level of stability.

      BTW, their last mini-server used that Intel chipset that was defective (the C2000), but haven't seen any evidence that their platform was affected.

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      • #4
        Instead of using a dedicated NAS I instead chose to do a simple software raid on my main machine. Some of my friends thought I was crazy but I didn't have to buy dedicated hardware, I am not locked into a hardware raid vendor, I don't have to go over a network to access it, etc. Most of my friends are running dedicated NASes but only use it in the same ways I am... it doesn't make sense. All that to say, I think dedicated NASes are overkill for a significant percentage of people who are just using it for movie storage or data backup.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bpetty View Post
          All that to say, I think dedicated NASes are overkill for a significant percentage of people who are just using it for movie storage or data backup.
          The 8+ TB SMR disks are designed for movie/backup use. As long as you use them properly. You get over 1000 Mbps of bandwidth which saturates even a gigabit LAN. But, movie streams are < 50 Mbps and even 4K < 100 Mbps so the hardware is overkill even as a movie storage. Rpi3 and USB-SATA bridge is enough for HTPC use. The dedicated NAS systems with ECC are designed for totally different use cases. 5+ concurrent users, 2 to 10 gigabit LAN, 24/7 use with 99.999 availability, fast recovery. Zero room for failures. Mission critical systems for small enterprises. Not for home use. Sure, if you have extra cash, why not buy one.

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          • #6
            We use FreeNAS in our small business and IMHO it's the best thing we could have done. Easy backups with all major desktops and jails for some small services that are nice to have locally, for example unifi.
            And best of all: encrypted zfs, so everything is save in case the nas gets stolen
            I'm heavily looking forward to version 11!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bpetty View Post
              Some of my friends thought I was crazy but I didn't have to buy dedicated hardware, I am not locked into a hardware raid vendor, I don't have to go over a network to access it, etc. Most of my friends are running dedicated NASes but only use it in the same ways I am... it doesn't make sense.
              In going with FreeNAS does not lock you into a hardware raid vendor. Quite the opposite really cause FreeNAS has ZFS, which is a filesystem with raid support built in, essentially software raid, but at the file-system level. You do not need any special hardware for this, just any controller that can connect the drives to the OS.

              Originally posted by bpetty View Post
              Most of my friends are running dedicated NASes but only use it in the same ways I am... it doesn't make sense.
              Although that can be fine in some cases, it isn't always the right way to go. Sometimes, you need a separation of duties. For instance, if you primary machine is also used for Gaming, that could be bad if a movie is simultaneously trying to be ready from your system, potentially affecting your system or network performance.

              Originally posted by bpetty View Post
              All that to say, I think dedicated NASes are overkill for a significant percentage of people who are just using it for movie storage or data backup.
              So, while I would agree, that some cases do not warrant for creating an entire dedicated NAS, with the growth of Plex, Kodi, and the pleathure of boxes like Roku or Nvidia Shield, a dedicated NAS definitely has more need that I think you give credit. I like turning of my desktop when not in use, but if acting as the NAS as well, I wouldn't be able to do that, which would consume a lot more power running 24x7 than my NAS, running FreeNAS with Plex, CrashPlan and NextCloud.

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