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GNOME's Mutter Adds XWayland Full-Screen Games Workaround

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  • GNOME's Mutter Adds XWayland Full-Screen Games Workaround

    Phoronix: GNOME's Mutter Adds XWayland Full-Screen Games Workaround

    Thanks to Red Hat's Hans de Goede there is another optimization to GNOME's Mutter around XWayland full-screen gaming...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...er-XWayland-WA

  • #2
    Big day in GNOME! Hans being awesome is nothing new.

    Extension will soon move to GNOME Gitlab. Expect better support and CI.
    https://gitlab.gnome.org/World/Shell...sions-rebooted

    LibreOffice got even more GNOMEd.
    http://caolanm.blogspot.com/2019/10/native-gtk-dialogs-in-libreoffice.html

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    • #3
      Typo:

      Originally posted by phoronix View Post
      Games making use of the SFLM 2D game library

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      • #4
        What I don't understand is Gnome Wayland being slower than KDE's X session. Not to mention Gnome X being the slowest. Furthermore, Gnome uses twice as RAM as KDE. After all this talking about performance and optimizations I'n seeing none. There are also no serious gtk3 applications at all while there are dozens of them written in Qt.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Volta View Post
          What I don't understand is Gnome Wayland being slower than KDE's X session. Not to mention Gnome X being the slowest. Furthermore, Gnome uses twice as RAM as KDE. After all this talking about performance and optimizations I'n seeing none. There are also no serious gtk3 applications at all while there are dozens of them written in Qt.
          I use GNOME at home and work and nearly every application I use uses GTK3 in some way, including Firefox.

          Only exception I can think of are the various electron communication apps and vscode.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Volta View Post
            What I don't understand is Gnome Wayland being slower than KDE's X session. Not to mention Gnome X being the slowest. Furthermore, Gnome uses twice as RAM as KDE. After all this talking about performance and optimizations I'n seeing none. There are also no serious gtk3 applications at all while there are dozens of them written in Qt.
            I haven't used it in awhile, is it still so bad? Last time I was still having to pull in a ton of extra applications from other desktops or other projects, because the Gnome apps were too childish in their simplicity and lack of config options. Add to that the constant requirement to pull in tweaks and extensions to get a halfway useful desktop, and then have to do it all over again with each point release of Gnome, which would then break half the extensions or tweaks I was relying on. Fairly maddening process. Ended up with a fat, slow desktop that was kind of nice looking in a Disney animation kind of way, but with lots of out-of-place apps with mis-matched window decorations in order to get work done.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Volta View Post
              What I don't understand is Gnome Wayland being slower than KDE's X session. Not to mention Gnome X being the slowest. Furthermore, Gnome uses twice as RAM as KDE. After all this talking about performance and optimizations I'n seeing none. There are also no serious gtk3 applications at all while there are dozens of them written in Qt.
              What exactly do you mean with 'slow'? Concerning RAM: currently there are still a few things loaded unconditionally that should only be loaded on demand. One example would be the several evolution services, another one Gnome Software. Gnome Shell alone stands at 130MiB right now for me, which I'd consider more than ok

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              • #8
                Originally posted by andyprough View Post

                I haven't used it in awhile, is it still so bad? Last time I was still having to pull in a ton of extra applications from other desktops or other projects, because the Gnome apps were too childish in their simplicity and lack of config options. Add to that the constant requirement to pull in tweaks and extensions to get a halfway useful desktop, and then have to do it all over again with each point release of Gnome, which would then break half the extensions or tweaks I was relying on. Fairly maddening process. Ended up with a fat, slow desktop that was kind of nice looking in a Disney animation kind of way, but with lots of out-of-place apps with mis-matched window decorations in order to get work done.

                I can understand your confusion if you haven't kept up. Gnome DE and by extension GTK is the default Linux DE and toolkit now. This has happened by default from the fact that when you combine global commercial, institutional and personal installs of Ubuntu and Ubuntu based distros plus Red Hat/Fedora based distros plus Debian and Debian based distros you get a OVERWHELMING majority percentage of those distros by default running a Gnome or GTK based DE. The ONLY MAJOR commercial distro in the entire world that defaults to KDE is Suse and they are a very small also ran when it comes to the combined commercial and cloud based Linux installs of Ubuntu and Red Hat. And that's even BEFORE you include Debian.

                KDE had their chance. But the entire KDE 4 and early 5 cycle pretty much sealed their fate as an also ran when it comes to Linux DE's. I've used KDE from the v.3 through the first 5 dot releases of KDE 5. I have used Gnome since 2000. I'll never go back to KDE. Between IBM/Red Hat AND Debian/Ubuntu, Gnome and GTK is THE Linux DE and DE toolkit going forward. You may not like it. Gnome may even NOT be the best. But like Windows and Mac OS-X and Android there can really only be ONE DE in order for the masses to accept a platform. The ONLY hope Linux has of wider acceptance by the mass public and not just for hackers and nerds is to have one DE. That is now Gnome.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Britoid View Post

                  I use GNOME at home and work and nearly every application I use uses GTK3 in some way, including Firefox.

                  Only exception I can think of are the various electron communication apps and vscode.
                  Except KDE runs GTK apps just fine. The earlier poster is right. I've benchmarked both with non-gaming and gaming workloads. KDE is faster and lighter. I don't understand why GNOME is such a dog when it comes to performance, especially under X11.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jumbotron View Post


                    I can understand your confusion if you haven't kept up. Gnome DE and by extension GTK is the default Linux DE and toolkit now. This has happened by default from the fact that when you combine global commercial, institutional and personal installs of Ubuntu and Ubuntu based distros plus Red Hat/Fedora based distros plus Debian and Debian based distros you get a OVERWHELMING majority percentage of those distros by default running a Gnome or GTK based DE. The ONLY MAJOR commercial distro in the entire world that defaults to KDE is Suse and they are a very small also ran when it comes to the combined commercial and cloud based Linux installs of Ubuntu and Red Hat. And that's even BEFORE you include Debian.

                    KDE had their chance. But the entire KDE 4 and early 5 cycle pretty much sealed their fate as an also ran when it comes to Linux DE's. I've used KDE from the v.3 through the first 5 dot releases of KDE 5. I have used Gnome since 2000. I'll never go back to KDE. Between IBM/Red Hat AND Debian/Ubuntu, Gnome and GTK is THE Linux DE and DE toolkit going forward. You may not like it. Gnome may even NOT be the best. But like Windows and Mac OS-X and Android there can really only be ONE DE in order for the masses to accept a platform. The ONLY hope Linux has of wider acceptance by the mass public and not just for hackers and nerds is to have one DE. That is now Gnome.
                    KDE5 is waaay different from KDE4.

                    EDIT: There are plenty of popular distros that don't use GNOME. Manjaro and Deepin come to mind immediately, Ubuntu has a KDE spin that is used, and there are others.

                    EDIT #2: and if you believe distrowatch, XFCE is the most popular DE, not GNOME.
                    Last edited by betam4x; 11-01-2019, 01:31 PM.

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