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AMD Posts Open-Source Linux Driver Support For "NAVI 14" GPU

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  • AMD Posts Open-Source Linux Driver Support For "NAVI 14" GPU

    Phoronix: AMD Posts Open-Source Linux Driver Support For "NAVI 14" GPU

    While the Radeon RX 5700 "Navi 10" series is launching on 7 July and there was the recently presented open-source Linux patches (so far for the AMDGPU kernel driver and RadeonSI OpenGL; Vulkan support still pending), today was the surprise move of posting the kernel patches for an unannounced "Navi 14" graphics processor...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Source-NAVI-14

  • #2
    I'm assuming "Navi 14" is a follow-on small Navi but I'll give AMD credit for posting source code longer in advance so that it might actually be working in mainline when the cards launch.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by chuckula View Post
      I'm assuming "Navi 14" is a follow-on small Navi but I'll give AMD credit for posting source code longer in advance so that it might actually be working in mainline when the cards launch.
      <speculation>
      1. I wonder if it is a workstation/server card with it's "virtual display" - seems like something remote desktop environments would like.
      2. I wonder if it is the card that Google will be using for Stadia? again, virtual display would seem like a good thing here
      </speculation>

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      • #4
        Originally posted by boxie View Post

        <speculation>
        1. I wonder if it is a workstation/server card with it's "virtual display" - seems like something remote desktop environments would like.
        2. I wonder if it is the card that Google will be using for Stadia? again, virtual display would seem like a good thing here
        </speculation>
        Stadia is already built on customized variant's of Vega56 so no it doesn't require anything that Navi has. The datacenter variants of Vega 10 can support SR-IOV which would obviate the need for any virtual display.

        Virtual display sounds alot like virtual super resolution on windows... which just downscales from a higher resolution to the physical display meaning there is more data there than can be displayed unlike all the various antialiasing schemes which basically just smooth existing images.

        I suppose virutal display could also be an alterantive to SR-IOV at the consumer level but why implement something like that instead of just allowing SR-IOV... to beging with.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cb88 View Post

          Stadia is already built on customized variant's of Vega56 so no it doesn't require anything that Navi has. The datacenter variants of Vega 10 can support SR-IOV which would obviate the need for any virtual display.

          Virtual display sounds alot like virtual super resolution on windows... which just downscales from a higher resolution to the physical display meaning there is more data there than can be displayed unlike all the various antialiasing schemes which basically just smooth existing images.

          I suppose virutal display could also be an alterantive to SR-IOV at the consumer level but why implement something like that instead of just allowing SR-IOV... to beging with.
          Just re-read the announcement doc, they do not specifically call out a uArch - they do say "SR-IOV, 56 CU's and HBM2" Custom GPU.

          Currently a vega56 DC GPU fits that - but being that AMD does a lot of custom stuff, I wouldn't be surprised if it is a custom Navi (given launch timelines) for power saving.

          and yes, I had forgotten about VSR on the windows driver, it could be that feature making its way into the product line.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by boxie View Post

            Just re-read the announcement doc, they do not specifically call out a uArch - they do say "SR-IOV, 56 CU's and HBM2" Custom GPU.

            Currently a vega56 DC GPU fits that - but being that AMD does a lot of custom stuff, I wouldn't be surprised if it is a custom Navi (given launch timelines) for power saving.

            and yes, I had forgotten about VSR on the windows driver, it could be that feature making its way into the product line.
            Maybe, I was thinking custom more as in how can we cram as many of these into a box as possible and get low latency video encoding in there.... so I'd think a custom Vega or Navi die + custom video hardware + network uplink straight off the card.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cb88 View Post

              Maybe, I was thinking custom more as in how can we cram as many of these into a box as possible and get low latency video encoding in there.... so I'd think a custom Vega or Navi die + custom video hardware + network uplink straight off the card.
              that certainly all makes sense. Output video directly into video encoder -> pcie transit directly out of the hosts NIC would certainly be an interesting custom solution.

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              • #8
                What's the difference between AMDGPU and AMDGPU PRO?

                What hides the closed source implementation?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DebianLinuxero View Post
                  What's the difference between AMDGPU and AMDGPU PRO?

                  What hides the closed source implementation?
                  The "PRO" contains:
                  a more updated kernel driver, but that part is upstreamed regularly into AMDGPU
                  the proprietary userspace blob that provides OpenGL/CL/Vulkan/whatever and replaces Mesa (which is what AMDGPU uses)

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                  • #10
                    <sarcasm>Will this driver be as stable as vega's one?</sarcasm>

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