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AMD Announces Automotive-Grade Ryzen Embedded V2000A Series

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  • AMD Announces Automotive-Grade Ryzen Embedded V2000A Series

    Phoronix: AMD Announces Automotive-Grade Ryzen Embedded V2000A Series

    Ahead of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) next week in Las Vegas, AMD announced today the Versal AI Edge XA Adaptive SoC and the Ryzen Embedded V2000A Series processor. The Ryzen Embedded V2000A is an x86 automotive-qualified processor family for next-generation automotive digital cockpits. Given the automotive/embedded focus, Linux plays a big role with the hardware...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Strange they're Zen2 based.

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    • #3
      Mobile devices are pretty much exclusively ARM, and it looks like ARM is going to increasingly appear in servers and data centers, and in 2024 it is expected that ARM will do an entrance to PC laptops and maybe desktops with the Snapdragon Elite.
      So it looks like x86 is gradually fading and getting more challenged.

      Cars doesn't sound like something that has legacy x86 requirements so I think it would make more sense to use ARM or RISC-V in a car.

      I wonder if AMD is planning any ARM or RISC-V CPU. Is it just a matter of time?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        Mobile devices are pretty much exclusively ARM, and it looks like ARM is going to increasingly appear in servers and data centers, and in 2024 it is expected that ARM will do an entrance to PC laptops and maybe desktops with the Snapdragon Elite.
        So it looks like x86 is gradually fading and getting more challenged.

        Cars doesn't sound like something that has legacy x86 requirements so I think it would make more sense to use ARM or RISC-V in a car.

        I wonder if AMD is planning any ARM or RISC-V CPU. Is it just a matter of time?
        Infotainment might require "legacy" support. Those games may run on a desktop OS and use Proton/Wine and or Steam in a transparent way. Vietualization is used as a resource and security containerization. Xen is OS agnostic, so the game may run inside a virtual machine on Android or Linux or Windows

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          Mobile devices are pretty much exclusively ARM, and it looks like ARM is going to increasingly appear in servers and data centers, and in 2024 it is expected that ARM will do an entrance to PC laptops and maybe desktops with the Snapdragon Elite.
          So it looks like x86 is gradually fading and getting more challenged.

          Cars doesn't sound like something that has legacy x86 requirements so I think it would make more sense to use ARM or RISC-V in a car.

          I wonder if AMD is planning any ARM or RISC-V CPU. Is it just a matter of time?
          x86 is pretty common in cars. The requirements are certainly ratcheting up quickly given what manufacturers want to do with computer vision, infotainment, etc. Really most of the needs can be met well with either x86 or ARM, and probably RISC-V in the not too distant future. But it probably wouldn't be as easy for me to play stuff like Cuphead and Vampire Survivors on ARM .

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            Cars doesn't sound like something that has legacy x86 requirements so I think it would make more sense to use ARM or RISC-V in a car.
            Agreed. I'm sure this was mostly opportunity cost that made them side with Zen2. It could be that at the time that this embedded system was designed it was the best choice that was already proven in consoles. Now it's many years later and there are better solutions. The embedded V1000 took extremely long to be released. It doesn't look like it's a high priority for AMD.

            ‚ÄčI wonder if AMD is planning any ARM or RISC-V CPU. Is it just a matter of time?
            I know AMD tried ARMv-A between 2014 and 2017 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_K12

            AMD still has an ARM license but AFAIK the only major use case is the PSP chip. Based on previous discussions, I wonder if AMD will drop legacy x86 from AMD64 before they try the ARM route again. Major speculation either way.

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            • #7
              Oh yeah?

              Well how many miles per gallon does this supposed new automotive-grade Ryzen SoC get?

              That's all I want to know

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              • #8
                The fact that you can install Steam in a Tesla and run Cyberpunk should make it obvious to anyone who plays games why x86 would be a good fit for infotainment. Would I pay for that? Hell no! But if I had a choice between x86 that allows me to play most of my 500+ Steam games on x86, or go with ARM or RISC that allows me to play zero games, I would go with the former. There are probably translation layers or at least there will be in the future to mitigate this, but as of this moment I fail to see the logic in calling x86 "legacy".

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  Mobile devices are pretty much exclusively ARM
                  Not all mobile devices, but especially not infotainment and automotive systems.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                    Strange they're Zen2 based.
                    Not to the auto industry who dictated they want cheaper smaller die size and cooler to run.

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