Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Sandy Bridge Core i7 3960X Benchmarked Against Today's Six-Core / 12 Thread AMD/Intel CPUs

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by yokem55 View Post
    And I generally agree with you - But you do have to be pretty mindful of where the code you are running is coming from. Ie making sure all your repo's are signed, don't install random .deb's, tarballs, appimages, etc. Even building electron apps from source can be risky because of the security shit-show that npm is. The same problem with apps installed with pip/pypi. Also you have to cross your fingers that this stuff never becomes easily exploitable via javascript in your browser...
    Yeah I haven't seen any reports of Spectre/Meltdown/etc exploits in the wild, but then again who knows how many zero days or unknown attacks exist at the moment (on a side note- Zero Days documentary was a great watch)

    What brings me peace at home is that a router gives a good line of defense. I only have one port open and that's for OpenVPN via the pi-hole (using PiVPN software). If for example there's an exploit in OpenVPN, there's a clear entry for an attacker on my IP. Any other interface I can hopefully safely assume is inaccessible. I imagine if you have a webserver/ssh/etc on, even more points of entry. Shell shock, Heartbleed, I'm sure more will come out.

    The pi-hole is nice because you see an overview of your network requests across all your devices on the network. So if a Windows PC on the network was phoning home, you'd know right away. In terms of software, I get all my apps from official websites, git and package repositories but like you said, huge trust system there.

    The web browser is definitely the easiest point of entry. I'm using Firefox + the pi-hole to block ads/malicious domains + DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials. I should probably go a step further and be responsible and install the NoScript extension. Firefox also came out with a Firefox Private Network addon the other day which is pretty cool.

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by perpetually high View Post
      Btw: that nice command is inverted. That's giving the process a priority of +12 (lower priority) instead of -12 (higher priority) which I'm sure is what you wanted.
      It isn't inverted. Build tasks aren't interactive applications and so giving them higher priority seems contradictory to me. I don't want build tasks to run with higher priority than Chrome/Firefox for example.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

        It isn't inverted. Build tasks aren't interactive applications and so giving them higher priority seems contradictory to me. I don't want build tasks to run with higher priority than Chrome/Firefox for example.
        Gotcha, my bad. Yeah that makes sense. I thought in the context of what we were talking about you were trying to squeeze latency/priority but I misread.

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by phoronix View Post
          Phoronix: The Sandy Bridge Core i7 3960X Benchmarked Against Today's Six-Core / 12 Thread AMD/Intel CPUs
          What's the memory configuration of the 3960X - did you use dual-channel or quad-channel? What speed?

          Also, the article doesn't mention that the 3 newer systems used a NVMe SSD, while the Sandy Bridge used SATA. That said, the NVMe drive was one of the slower models out there, but IMO it should be noted.

          Thanks.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by coder View Post
            What's the memory configuration of the 3960X - did you use dual-channel or quad-channel? What speed?

            Also, the article doesn't mention that the 3 newer systems used a NVMe SSD, while the Sandy Bridge used SATA. That said, the NVMe drive was one of the slower models out there, but IMO it should be noted.

            Thanks.
            The drives are mentioned in the system article, but anyhow the workloads tested sans like the Linux kernel build test were all CPU focused so shouldn't be touching the drives in any meaningful manner.
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by coder View Post
              What's the memory configuration of the 3960X - did you use dual-channel or quad-channel? What speed?

              Also, the article doesn't mention that the 3 newer systems used a NVMe SSD, while the Sandy Bridge used SATA. That said, the NVMe drive was one of the slower models out there, but IMO it should be noted.

              Thanks.
              Quad channel, don't remember the speed offhand but would be whatever the optimal rated configuration was.
              Michael Larabel
              http://www.michaellarabel.com/

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
                • If a machine feels unresponsive then the user should primarily take a look at how many tasks are competing for the available hardware threads and should check whether the peak number of running tasks exceeds the number of HW threads. A desktop environment indicator such as xfce4-systemload-plugin can help identify cases of high CPU utilization. The scheduling priority of build jobs (Makefiles, etc) should be kept lower than the scheduling priority of GUI applications.
                One issue I've run into is libraries that create their own thread pools. It's becoming more common, too. It'd be nice if there was some unified way for all of the libraries in an app to negotiate how many threads each should launch. Or, better yet, to have each be capable of submitting work to a shared thread pool.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by Michael View Post
                  Quad channel, don't remember the speed offhand but would be whatever the optimal rated configuration was.
                  Thanks. Does PTS log raw dmidecode output?

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by coder View Post
                    Thanks. Does PTS log raw dmidecode output?
                    Yes it parses dmidecode to report more detailed RAM information, when run as root.... Sadly dmidecode is of no use when running as normal user, sure wish there could be improvements to that area for Linux.
                    Michael Larabel
                    http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
                      I agree that mitigations=off is good for notebook&desktop machines (assuming the user ensures that the machine never runs malicious code).
                      Yeah, as long as you don't run any web browsers on the box. Otherwise, you can certainly run malicious code, in the form of javascript + web assembly.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X