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RISC-V Support Continues Maturing Within The Mainline Linux Kernel

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  • RISC-V Support Continues Maturing Within The Mainline Linux Kernel

    Phoronix: RISC-V Support Continues Maturing Within The Mainline Linux Kernel

    The initial RISC-V architecture support landed in Linux 4.15 and now this open-source, royalty-free processor ISA is seeing further improvements with the Linux 4.17 cycle...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...x-4.17-Updates

  • #2
    Was spectre's absence confirmed in RISC v more complex cores such as Boom ?

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    • #3
      AFAIK CPU ISA, and its silicon implementation are different.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GunpowaderGuy View Post
        Was spectre's absence confirmed in RISC v more complex cores such as Boom ?
        No announced RISC-V silicon is susceptible, and the popular open-source RISC-V Rocket processor is unaffected as it does not perform memory accesses speculatively.
        https://riscv.org/2018/01/more-secure-world-risc-v-isa/

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        • #5
          Personally, I'm holding out for RISC-VI.

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          • #6
            NVIDIA has spoken in the last two years on plans to adopt RISC-V in their "Falcon Next Gen", which is their dGPU's NVIDIA proprietary control processor. There's ~10 of them on each dGPU.

            Their public comments, including the two below, outline the side-by-side comparisons for their use case:

            https://riscv.org/wp-content/uploads...V_Story_V2.pdf

            https://riscv.org/wp-content/uploads...ijstermans.pdf

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            • #7
              Why would Samsung want RISC-V? Would it be easier to get mainline support compared to using ARM or is it purely licensing costs?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by rhysk View Post
                NVIDIA has spoken in the last two years on plans to adopt RISC-V in their "Falcon Next Gen", which is their dGPU's NVIDIA proprietary control processor. There's ~10 of them on each dGPU.
                I had seen all of that, but where does it say 10 per dGPU? From what I recall, it was only up to 2.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by coder View Post
                  I had seen all of that, but where does it say 10 per dGPU? From what I recall, it was only up to 2.
                  Second presentation linked, page 3. Referenced in the table on the right hand side that there are on average 10 Falcons per GPU.

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