Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oracle Offers Its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel On GitHub

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

    Not even Oracle can change the license of the Linux Kernel source code.
    That wouldn't stop them trying, and throwing plenty of lawyers at it. If they can threaten you into settling out of court, they win.

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by brrrrttttt View Post
      That wouldn't stop them trying, and throwing plenty of lawyers at it. If they can threaten you into settling out of court, they win.
      Which would be kicked out even from the East Texas court since Oracle can not show ownership of the copyright to the Linux Kernel. If you think that SCO had it rough with their days in court then just wait for the pain that would rain on Oracle if they ever tried to walk this way.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post
        Which would be kicked out even from the East Texas court since Oracle can not show ownership of the copyright to the Linux Kernel. If you think that SCO had it rough with their days in court then just wait for the pain that would rain on Oracle if they ever tried to walk this way.
        Legal battles in legal trolling aren't about winning but about endurance in paying expensive lawyers.

        SCO was still harassing IBM (of all things) over the same crap in 2017, that's a decade-long legal troll. https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...ase-sco-v-ibm/

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          Legal battles in legal trolling aren't about winning but about endurance in paying expensive lawyers.

          SCO was still harassing IBM (of all things) over the same crap in 2017, that's a decade-long legal troll. https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...ase-sco-v-ibm/
          The SCO case was completely different, they claimed that the Linux kernel was infringing on their copyrights due to people (IBM being one) allegedly copying code from Unix into Linux. So the case was drawn out for eternity since the court had to decide if code was similar enough, if code was really copied, if SCO really had the copyrights that they said they had and so on. Also note that lot's of people actually feared that SCO was on to something before people like Pamela Jones started to dig into the case.

          Trying to claim copyright on the Linux Kernel source code however would be something completely different, the Linux Foundation even holds a trademark over Linux so any such case would most likely be thrown out of a court before it even started. But then I live in a country where companies cannot drag out court cases in the way SCO did so I might underestimate the crazy of the US civil court system.

          Comment

          Working...
          X