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Oracle Offers Its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel On GitHub

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  • #21
    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post

    i dont think many from the tin foil community realize that Oracle is a business and as such needs to protect itself from those that want its business. Oracle can leversge and support an open source kernel because there is no value in the operating system to them. They add value at a higher level just like Apple and many other companies.
    So, from the kernel and community point of view they simply suck. With btrfs they failed and btrfs main developer is working at facebook afaik.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Rallos Zek View Post

      Nothing! Since they release the sources under the same terms as the Vanilla Kernel what makes you think they are using hooks to do some underhanded stuff? Are you trolling or in need of a tin foil hat?
      I take it you're unfamiliar with Oracle's business practices? They're seriously hostile to their own customers who pay them boatloads of money... why do you think they wouldn't be to somebody providing them exactly $0? As an example (relatively mild for Oracle): https://www.businessinsider.com.au/o...threats-2015-9

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      • #23
        Originally posted by kaczu View Post

        Um where have you been? Oracle changes software licenses on a dime if they can make money from it.
        Not even Oracle can change the license of the Linux Kernel source code.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

          Not even Oracle can change the license of the Linux Kernel source code.
          That wouldn't stop them trying, and throwing plenty of lawyers at it. If they can threaten you into settling out of court, they win.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by brrrrttttt View Post
            That wouldn't stop them trying, and throwing plenty of lawyers at it. If they can threaten you into settling out of court, they win.
            Which would be kicked out even from the East Texas court since Oracle can not show ownership of the copyright to the Linux Kernel. If you think that SCO had it rough with their days in court then just wait for the pain that would rain on Oracle if they ever tried to walk this way.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post
              Which would be kicked out even from the East Texas court since Oracle can not show ownership of the copyright to the Linux Kernel. If you think that SCO had it rough with their days in court then just wait for the pain that would rain on Oracle if they ever tried to walk this way.
              Legal battles in legal trolling aren't about winning but about endurance in paying expensive lawyers.

              SCO was still harassing IBM (of all things) over the same crap in 2017, that's a decade-long legal troll. https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...ase-sco-v-ibm/

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              • #27
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                Legal battles in legal trolling aren't about winning but about endurance in paying expensive lawyers.

                SCO was still harassing IBM (of all things) over the same crap in 2017, that's a decade-long legal troll. https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...ase-sco-v-ibm/
                The SCO case was completely different, they claimed that the Linux kernel was infringing on their copyrights due to people (IBM being one) allegedly copying code from Unix into Linux. So the case was drawn out for eternity since the court had to decide if code was similar enough, if code was really copied, if SCO really had the copyrights that they said they had and so on. Also note that lot's of people actually feared that SCO was on to something before people like Pamela Jones started to dig into the case.

                Trying to claim copyright on the Linux Kernel source code however would be something completely different, the Linux Foundation even holds a trademark over Linux so any such case would most likely be thrown out of a court before it even started. But then I live in a country where companies cannot drag out court cases in the way SCO did so I might underestimate the crazy of the US civil court system.

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