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Android Studio 3.0 Preview Release: Kotlin, Java 8 Features

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  • Android Studio 3.0 Preview Release: Kotlin, Java 8 Features

    Phoronix: Android Studio 3.0 Preview Release: Kotlin, Java 8 Features

    Some additional Android news from Google I/O 2017 is the first preview (Canary 1) release of the Android Studio 3.0 integrated development environment...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...o-3.0-Canary-1

  • #2
    Android Studio is a bloated POS. And Kotlin is the new kid on the block. I'm happy I gave up my programming career years ago, otherwise I would have gone crazy with all this new sh*t.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by wargames View Post
      Android Studio is a bloated POS. And Kotlin is the new kid on the block. I'm happy I gave up my programming career years ago, otherwise I would have gone crazy with all this new sh*t.
      This "new sh*t" is is simple Darwinism. Survival of the fittest. Adapt or lose job opportunities.
      I've taken quite a liking to it.

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      • #4
        In a way we can thank Oracle for forcing Google to adopt OpenJDK; because it means that a lot of JVM languages might start to be viable for app development. I wonder if Clojure, Scala, Jython, or JRuby are on the table.

        I don't particularly care for these languages, but to have convenient (and maintained) access to them is always better than not having it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by microcode View Post
          In a way we can thank Oracle for forcing Google to adopt OpenJDK; because it means that a lot of JVM languages might start to be viable for app development. I wonder if Clojure, Scala, Jython, or JRuby are on the table.

          I don't particularly care for these languages, but to have convenient (and maintained) access to them is always better than not having it.
          Scala has been used on Android for years.. I tried it for the first time (on Android) in 2010.
          Last edited by caligula; 05-18-2017, 03:12 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by microcode View Post
            In a way we can thank Oracle for forcing Google to adopt OpenJDK; because it means that a lot of JVM languages might start to be viable for app development. I wonder if Clojure, Scala, Jython, or JRuby are on the table.

            I don't particularly care for these languages, but to have convenient (and maintained) access to them is always better than not having it.
            I hate Oracle as much as the next guy, yet:

            #1 I'm not sure how Oracle forced Google to use OpenJDK.
            #2 Assuming #1 was true, I'm not sure how that makes other languages more viable. Those languages rely on the JVM spec, not a particular implementation.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post

              I hate Oracle as much as the next guy, yet:

              #1 I'm not sure how Oracle forced Google to use OpenJDK.
              #2 Assuming #1 was true, I'm not sure how that makes other languages more viable. Those languages rely on the JVM spec, not a particular implementation.
              He's basically referring to the Oracle vs Google lawsuit, but yeah... no that didn't force Google to use OpenJDK, because Google basically won those trials in what matters towards their continued use. As to those other languages... the options for languages to target Android has multitudinous for years. If you don't want to do Java you can do that... if you don't even want to develop against the Android API you can actually even do that too with C++ and Qt Quick and a couple other options. Heck apparently you can even use Rust on Android if you want https://github.com/tomaka/android-rs-glue .

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bug77 View Post

                I hate Oracle as much as the next guy, yet:

                #1 I'm not sure how Oracle forced Google to use OpenJDK.
                Perhaps "forced" wasn't quite the right word for the spot. Technically, google could have caved in and paid all the "royalties" that they demanded for their "free" crap. The easiest to implement mechanism to avoid that was what Google took, which is to break away from anything that oracle could even REMOTELY claim deserved royalties. The switch to openjdk basically screwed oracle, while sticking with oraclejdk would have maintained at least the POTENTIAL to step into proprietary chunks.

                I have a feeling that if Google were to do it again from the ground up, very likely Java wouldn't have been part of Android. The problem is that Android was deeply tied to Java already when Google acquired them.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by droidhacker View Post

                  Perhaps "forced" wasn't quite the right word for the spot. Technically, google could have caved in and paid all the "royalties" that they demanded for their "free" crap. The easiest to implement mechanism to avoid that was what Google took, which is to break away from anything that oracle could even REMOTELY claim deserved royalties. The switch to openjdk basically screwed oracle, while sticking with oraclejdk would have maintained at least the POTENTIAL to step into proprietary chunks.

                  I have a feeling that if Google were to do it again from the ground up, very likely Java wouldn't have been part of Android. The problem is that Android was deeply tied to Java already when Google acquired them.
                  I'm still not sure why you say Google moved to OpenJDK. I'm not aware of any such move, last I tried Android Studio worked with Oracle's JDK just fine.
                  Android itself never relied on Oracle's JDK anyway, the runtime has always been completely different. What Google has reused is the Java API.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wargames View Post
                    Android Studio is a bloated POS. And Kotlin is the new kid on the block. I'm happy I gave up my programming career years ago, otherwise I would have gone crazy with all this new sh*t.
                    Because in other tech jobs it's not like this, nono.

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