Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Six Linux Distributions Benchmarked On The Dell XPS 9380 Laptop

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Six Linux Distributions Benchmarked On The Dell XPS 9380 Laptop

    Phoronix: Six Linux Distributions Benchmarked On The Dell XPS 9380 Laptop

    While Dell is offering the option of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS as the Linux option with their new XPS 9380 laptop, what happens if the Bionic Beaver isn't of interest to you? As part of our testing of the Dell XPS 9380 with Core i7 8565U laptop, I've just finished up testing six different Linux distributions on this 13-inch laptop.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=27504

  • #2
    As someone looking to purchase this laptop, my main concern is the wireless card. Being non-Intel and soldered, I am nervous as someone who likes to use lots of wireless peripherals. Can anyone who has used this laptop or the previous (9370) share their experiences with this? Thanks!

    Comment


    • #3
      I’d find some battery life numbers in comparison to Windows interesting. Browsing the web, playing videos from Netflix etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by phoenk View Post
        As someone looking to purchase this laptop, my main concern is the wireless card. Being non-Intel and soldered, I am nervous as someone who likes to use lots of wireless peripherals. Can anyone who has used this laptop or the previous (9370) share their experiences with this? Thanks!
        Having tested the Dell XPS 15 2:1 with a similar keyboard layout, I found the keyboard, and specifically the arrow key situation having the biggest impact for being able to be productive with any machine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlXNGVVeFJY

        Comment


        • #5
          OpenSuse "Tumbleweed" has a command to display and modify it's settings per this: https://doc.opensuse.org/documentati...tools.cpupower

          By setting to avoid higher p-states, "Tumbleweed" could be made more competitive - but it would need to be modified back, every time you removed the AC Adapter and needed more battery time. I'm not sure whether multiple 'profiles' could be created and invoked by name.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rene View Post

            Having tested the Dell XPS 15 2:1 with a similar keyboard layout, I found the keyboard, and specifically the arrow key situation having the biggest impact for being able to be productive with any machine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlXNGVVeFJY
            You posted it like 20 times already...

            I'm intrigued by Fedora's performance and energy efficiency, guessing it was on Gnome Wayland. Also, why 28 and not 29?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by alex79 View Post
              You posted it like 20 times already...
              Nah, maybe like three or four times. But that does not mean everyone has seen it yet, and Phoronix posts and links pop all up over the internet from /. to reddit, too, … so, ..?
              IMHO vendors can not be called out often enough for the unusable stuff they throw on the market.

              What does shiny and latest Intel i-whatever help when the keyboard, display etc. pp. sucks. Or thermal solution, like in the AMD ThinkPad that as only one of the two heat pipes the Intel flavour comes with, ..! :-/

              Most people want devices that work, and not have strange and different compromises on each new model out there.
              Last edited by rene; 02-06-2019, 07:18 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rickst29 View Post
                OpenSuse "Tumbleweed" has a command to display and modify it's settings per this: https://doc.opensuse.org/documentati...tools.cpupower

                By setting to avoid higher p-states, "Tumbleweed" could be made more competitive - but it would need to be modified back, every time you removed the AC Adapter and needed more battery time. I'm not sure whether multiple 'profiles' could be created and invoked by name.
                Some typical cpupower settings:
                Install package cpupower: > sudo zypper in cpupower

                > sudo cpupower frequency-set -g performance
                or
                > sudo cpupower frequency-set -g powersave

                to check info on the CPU, and see if you have any other preset frequency settings:
                > sudo cpupower frequency-info

                You can also use the cpupower frequency-set command to set your own preferred minimum, maximum, or specific frequencies.

                to see all options:
                > sudo cpupower --help

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by alex79 View Post
                  I'm intrigued by Fedora's performance and energy efficiency, guessing it was on Gnome Wayland. Also, why 28 and not 29?
                  Me too. About 28 vs 29, Michael is not clear in the article. The descriptions say 28, but in the text he's speaking about 29...I'd assume 29, as Xorg 1.20 was a very important step for Xwayland performance.
                  Over time, the Wayland backend (even with Xwayland) will become more efficient than Xorg by quite a big margin...awesome to see it already happening, even with many performance optimizations not yet implemented (e.g. using hardware planes for fullscreen applications).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by treba View Post

                    Me too. About 28 vs 29, Michael is not clear in the article. The descriptions say 28, but in the text he's speaking about 29...I'd assume 29, as Xorg 1.20 was a very important step for Xwayland performance.
                    Over time, the Wayland backend (even with Xwayland) will become more efficient than Xorg by quite a big margin...awesome to see it already happening, even with many performance optimizations not yet implemented (e.g. using hardware planes for fullscreen applications).
                    Fedora Workstation 29 was tested; what is shown in the system table under the OS string is always correct and all those fields automatically parsed. I just mistakenly typed 28 instead of 29 when saving the results.
                    Michael Larabel
                    http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X