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  • QEMU 2.3.0-rc2 Released

    Phoronix: QEMU 2.3.0-rc2 Released

    For users of QEMU as part of their Linux virtualization that wish to test out the very latest features, the QEMU 2.3-rc2 development release is now available...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...3-RC2-Released

  • #2
    QEMU is for geeks

    Well problem of QEMU was everytime typical Linux problem, lack of proper GUI.. Because without straighforward Virtualbox, Vmware, Hyper-V GUI is only geek or skilled technician tool with steep learning curve. I many times simply discover that lots of paper options dont work in some real life setting combination - for example on paper SPARC emulation was supported, but some instructions werent implemented, so SPARC support so vaporware . GUI is also good to simply disable user set up such combination without study of hundred page of documentation.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ruthan View Post
      Well problem of QEMU was everytime typical Linux problem, lack of proper GUI.. Because without straighforward Virtualbox, Vmware, Hyper-V GUI is only geek or skilled technician tool with steep learning curve. I many times simply discover that lots of paper options dont work in some real life setting combination - for example on paper SPARC emulation was supported, but some instructions werent implemented, so SPARC support so vaporware . GUI is also good to simply disable user set up such combination without study of hundred page of documentation.
      It seems to me that QEMU targets those "geek or skilled" users on purpose. It's probably because they know that libvirt supports them quite well, and of course libvirt has an agreeable interface (I never got it to work well - but I'm not that great with virt, so I assumed my own stupidity was to blame) I think that gnome boxes can also plug into QEMU as well. You might as well complain about no decent command line to KVM.

      I agree that that options are difficult to pick up, and I don't even have the variation of architectures that you have. I found the biggest difficulty being the transition from 1-2, and that fact that have the implementations out there are mixing them. Look at the docs for using coreos with qemu, they'are all 1.x, but they only released it maybe last year.

      I had to hack at my implementation for a few days, but eventually got things scripted decently even.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ruthan View Post
        Well problem of QEMU was everytime typical Linux problem, lack of proper GUI.. Because without straighforward Virtualbox, Vmware, Hyper-V GUI is only geek or skilled technician tool with steep learning curve. I many times simply discover that lots of paper options dont work in some real life setting combination - for example on paper SPARC emulation was supported, but some instructions werent implemented, so SPARC support so vaporware . GUI is also good to simply disable user set up such combination without study of hundred page of documentation.
        blah blah blah...
        do you think driving truck is for geeks as it require more qualification?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jaxxed View Post
          It seems to me that QEMU targets those "geek or skilled" users on purpose. It's probably because they know that libvirt supports them quite well, and of course libvirt has an agreeable interface (I never got it to work well - but I'm not that great with virt, so I assumed my own stupidity was to blame) I think that gnome boxes can also plug into QEMU as well. You might as well complain about no decent command line to KVM.
          Libvirt seems overly complicated for what I want to do. I get curious about a new distro and want to try it out. The daemon and the need to setup permissions are somewhat complicated. With VirtualBox I just need to add myself to the vbox group and have read/write access to where the virtual disk is stored.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ruthan View Post
            Well problem of QEMU was everytime typical Linux problem, lack of proper GUI..

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ruthan View Post
              Well problem of QEMU was everytime typical Linux problem, lack of proper GUI.. Because without straighforward Virtualbox, Vmware, Hyper-V GUI is only geek or skilled technician tool with steep learning curve. I many times simply discover that lots of paper options dont work in some real life setting combination - for example on paper SPARC emulation was supported, but some instructions werent implemented, so SPARC support so vaporware . GUI is also good to simply disable user set up such combination without study of hundred page of documentation.
              Please try GNOME Boxes.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ruthan View Post
                Well problem of QEMU was everytime typical Linux problem, lack of proper GUI..

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                • #9
                  http://sourceforge.net/projects/aqemu/
                  i won't post pretty pictures, as those have no meaning in this context

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by reub2000 View Post
                    Libvirt seems overly complicated for what I want to do. I get curious about a new distro and want to try it out. The daemon and the need to setup permissions are somewhat complicated. With VirtualBox I just need to add myself to the vbox group and have read/write access to where the virtual disk is stored.
                    Not really going to argue with you about vbox, it's easy to use when you're accustomed to it. I guess the 5.0 might actually improve performance too. I can't use it because performance in many dev environment use cases I need is poor, and data sharing ain't great. It's also a pain in the ass if you don't use a standard distro kernel, as you have to deal with dkms, or custom packages for the kmod.

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