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Fujitsu Developer Talks Up Btrfs File-System, Declares It Ready To Use

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  • Fujitsu Developer Talks Up Btrfs File-System, Declares It Ready To Use

    Phoronix: Fujitsu Developer Talks Up Btrfs File-System, Declares It Ready To Use

    Besides Oracle, Facebook, and SUSE, another major company that's been investing in the Btrfs next-generation Linux file-system has been Fujitsu. Btrfs already offers some compelling, ZFS-like features not found in other native Linux file-systems while more work is still happening...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTgzMzM

  • #2
    Why use a ZFS-like filesystem ...

    ... when you can se the real ZFS!

    A dependable filesystem takes decades to test/tune, ZFS has already done that and is well designed and implemented. Fuck the license zealots.. its free and it's available now, just use Gentoo, or Debian ... or FreeBSD.

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    • #3
      Since am an Ubuntu user I hope they will make this default for next interim release now. So enough users can test for the LTS!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wikinevick View Post
        ... when you can se the real ZFS!

        A dependable filesystem takes decades to test/tune, ZFS has already done that and is well designed and implemented. Fuck the license zealots.. its free and it's available now, just use Gentoo, or Debian ... or FreeBSD.
        The problem is that it's incompatible with the Linux kernel license, so it's never going to be included upstream. The reality of out-of-tree kernel modules is that they need to play catch-up on API changes inside of the kernel, so a distribution often ends up with the hard choice of delaying a kernel upgrade or dropping the out-of-tree module. This is why many distributions package the proprietary Nvidia driver but not Catalyst - they are better at keeping up with kernel / X upgrades, but it still causes delays for a rolling release like Arch.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by strcat View Post
          The problem is that it's incompatible with the Linux kernel license,
          More importantly (IMO): the license was deliberately chosen to be incompatible with the Linux kernel. Sun doesn't *want* Linux to use ZFS.

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          • #6
            Wait, didn't we just see corrupted snapshots with 3.17.1 a couple of weeks ago? That's not what I'd call "ready to use".

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pseus View Post
              Wait, didn't we just see corrupted snapshots with 3.17.1 a couple of weeks ago? That's not what I'd call "ready to use".
              That's good enough for Linux.

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              • #8
                Though my experience is home-use, I've been using Btrfs for a couple of months now as my torrent partition's file system and I have to say, that although I've had a few power outages and other problems, btrfs has been performing quite well for me. The write speed is far the fastest of them all and it's been found to be reliable by my own experiences. Also, online defrag works quite well. (although it shouldn't be necessary, I'm doing it every now and then)

                I'm using it with Linux Mint 17, which doesn't even have the latest kernel.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wikinevick View Post
                  ... when you can se the real ZFS!

                  A dependable filesystem takes decades to test/tune, ZFS has already done that and is well designed and implemented. Fuck the license zealots.. its free and it's available now, just use Gentoo, or Debian ... or FreeBSD.
                  The performance of zfs is just not good enough to meet the demands of Linux users

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Turion View Post
                    Though my experience is home-use, I've been using Btrfs for a couple of months now as my torrent partition's file system and I have to say, that although I've had a few power outages and other problems, btrfs has been performing quite well for me. The write speed is far the fastest of them all and it's been found to be reliable by my own experiences. Also, online defrag works quite well. (although it shouldn't be necessary, I'm doing it every now and then)

                    I'm using it with Linux Mint 17, which doesn't even have the latest kernel.
                    Home use is probably one of the few things that doesn't make it go dead that fast.
                    Try using the "stable" functions:
                    - run a scrub, while deleting a snapshot, while updating the filesystem interleaved with snapshotting it.
                    Do this for multiple volumes.
                    I have used btrfs without problems on my desktop. But I never ever have seen btrfs handle scrub+update+delete (happens when you have a cdn), and see btrfs survive it's own corruption.
                    Unfortunately corruption only happens with 1TB+ data...
                    scrubs are necessary to defrag the metadata, but also to check the disk contents.

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