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Linux 6.8 To Drop The SLAB Allocator, SLUB Optimizations Coming Too

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  • Linux 6.8 To Drop The SLAB Allocator, SLUB Optimizations Coming Too

    Phoronix: Linux 6.8 To Drop The SLAB Allocator, SLUB Optimizations Coming Too

    Following the SLOB allocator removal earlier this year, the Linux 6.8 kernel in the new year is now positioned to remove the SLAB allocator. Additionally, the lone good-for-everything SLUB allocator is set to receive further optimizations...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Are the slub optimizations security tested? Free/alloc optimizations are scary, without reading the code.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post
      Are the slub optimizations security tested? Free/alloc optimizations are scary, without reading the code.
      Maybe they should be using https://microsoft.github.io/mimalloc/

      Comment


      • #4
        finally found a solid reference to the origins of this term. from https://endler.dev/2020/folklore/#slab-allocator
        Slab allocation was invented by John Bonwick (Note: PDF file) in 1994 and has since been used by services like Memcached and the Linux Kernel.

        With slab allocation, a cache for a certain type or size of data object has a number of pre-allocated "slabs" of memory; within each slab there are memory chunks of fixed size suitable for the objects. (Wikpedia)

        The name slab comes from a teenage friend of Bonwick. He tells the story on the Oracle blog:

        While watching TV together, a commercial by Kellogg's came on with the tag line, "Can you pinch an inch?"

        The implication was that you were overweight if you could pinch more than an inch of fat on your waist — and that hoovering a bowl of corn flakes would help.

        Without missing a beat, Tommy, who weighed about 250 pounds, reached for his midsection and offered his response: "Hell, I can grab a slab!"

        A decade later, Bonwick remembered that term when he was looking for a word to describe the allocation of a larger chunk of memory.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post
          Are the slub optimizations security tested? Free/alloc optimizations are scary, without reading the code.
          Maybe they should (re)write the next memory allocator in rust to address some of your security concerns.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by spicfoo View Post

            Maybe they should be using https://microsoft.github.io/mimalloc/
            IF they want to turn the performance to shit

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

              Maybe they should (re)write the next memory allocator in rust to address some of your security concerns.
              Nope i hate rust. Just need security testing of "optimizations" before enrolling them.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post

                IF they want to turn the performance to shit
                How is that? https://github.com/microsoft/mimalloc#performance

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post

                  Nope i hate rust. Just need security testing of "optimizations" before enrolling them.
                  Well it's not about you. Linux kernel developers are already using Rust and it's usage is growing.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by spicfoo View Post

                    Well it's not about you. Linux kernel developers are already using Rust and it's usage is growing.
                    Correct. Linux is turning into corporate snakes oil.

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