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LXD 4.0 LTS Released For Offering The Latest Linux Containers Experience

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  • LXD 4.0 LTS Released For Offering The Latest Linux Containers Experience

    Phoronix: LXD 4.0 LTS Released For Offering The Latest Linux Containers Experience

    Ahead of the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release later this month, the Canonical folks working on LXD for Linux containers and VMs have released LXD 4.0 LTS...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...0-LTS-Released

  • #2
    This isn't available in RedHat-based distros. It's a pity.
    Anyway, I'm surivving with systemd-nspawn, which is nice but I don't know if it so featureful as LXD.

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    • #3
      That's not quite true.

      The snap package works just fine on CentOS 7 & 8, we in fact have active automated testing for this: https://jenkins.linuxcontainers.org/...latest-stable/
      If using a snap isn't an option, then we have a Fedora community packager who packages this all too (for Fedora & RHEL): https://copr.fedorainfracloud.org/co...lxc3/packages/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by q2dg View Post
        This isn't available in RedHat-based distros. It's a pity.
        Anyway, I'm surivving with systemd-nspawn, which is nice but I don't know if it so featureful as LXD.
        But probably you have "lxc", which is mostly like "lxd" without REST API. Debian doesn't ship lxd.deb packages as well, last efforts stopped months ago with a long list of unresolved dependecies. I use lxc to not follow the advice of upstream development "you can use snap images instead"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by q2dg View Post
          This isn't available in RedHat-based distros. It's a pity.
          Anyway, I'm surivving with systemd-nspawn, which is nice but I don't know if it so featureful as LXD.
          Nowdays they deliver it as a snap. Snapd is available on fedora, so this would be the way to try it.
          Iirc snap is even recommended way to get lxd...

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          • #6
            I tried to respond earlier but since the post had URLs in it, it got stuck in moderation...

            Anyway, the snap does work on a variety of distros and we have automated testing for it done on 15 distros/releases with many more where it works fine too.

            From an upstream support point of view, that's where you'll get the best experience as we can trivially reproduce any issue reported knowing we're running an absolutely identical environment. That being said, there are quite a few distributions with their own native packages that are doing a great job at keeping us with our (rather fast) release schedule. That includes official packages on Gentoo, ArchLinux, OpenSUSE and Alpine (there may be more I don't know of) and we have a packager who actively updates a COPR repo for use with Fedora, CentOS and RHEL.

            Whenever my previous post gets out of moderation, you'll get the links to those

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            • #7
              Originally posted by q2dg View Post
              This isn't available in RedHat-based distros. It's a pity.
              Anyway, I'm surivving with systemd-nspawn, which is nice but I don't know if it so featureful as LXD.
              My thoughts exactly. I'm better off running something like proxmox or ubuntu in a VM just for lxc/lxd.

              Last time I checked you need to reconfigure selinux and snap doesn't sandbox apps unless apparmor is installed. If that's still the case there's absolutely no way that I'm installing snap.

              I'm not trying to hate on snap, not saying it's bad. Just saying it does not fit my use-case/setups.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by stgraber View Post
                I tried to respond earlier but since the post had URLs in it, it got stuck in moderation...
                Should be fixed now, it's a mod queue just to ensure new registrars aren't link bot spammers.
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by slowee View Post

                  But probably you have "lxc", which is mostly like "lxd" without REST API. Debian doesn't ship lxd.deb packages as well, last efforts stopped months ago with a long list of unresolved dependecies. I use lxc to not follow the advice of upstream development "you can use snap images instead"
                  Just a heads up, I confirmed you can install LXC on CentOS 8 (I assume also RHEL 8):

                  Available Packages
                  Name : lxc
                  Version : 3.0.4
                  Release : 2.el8
                  Architecture : x86_64
                  Size : 327 k
                  Source : lxc-3.0.4-2.el8.src.rpm
                  Repository : epel
                  Summary : Linux Resource Containers
                  URL : http://linuxcontainers.org/lxc
                  License : LGPLv2+ and GPLv2
                  Description : Linux Resource Containers provide process and resource isolation without the
                  : overhead of full virtualization.


                  But you have to install the EPEL repo first, as that is where it is carried, with a "sudo dnf install epel-release":

                  epel-release.noarch : Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux repository configuration

                  But I know very little about it. Right now just started reading an article that hopefully will help me understand better the difference between LXC vs. Docker:

                  https://www.upguard.com/articles/docker-vs-lxc

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ehansin View Post
                    Right now just started reading an article that hopefully will help me understand better the difference between LXC vs. Docker:

                    https://www.upguard.com/articles/docker-vs-lxc
                    My 2 cents:
                    • Docker: network app packaging / deployment tech primarily (but not only) oriented toward cloud environments
                    • LXD: It's a VM to run Linux distros, without the overhead of actual virtualisation
                    If you develop a web service with a webserver, database and whatnot, want to have an automated repeatable build and an easy way to roll it out, use Docker.
                    If you need a second Linux environment to test stuff, install packages you don't want to pollute your main OS with, etc. use LXD.

                    Or, if you prefer: you can see Docker's use cases like Snap on steroids; LXD is like a much faster replacement for KVM/VMWare etc. that can only run Linux guests.

                    A little known but very useful feature of LXD is that with a little bit of simple config tweaking even graphical apps can run in it. And no, I'm not talking about "ssh -X". I'm talking about full native graphics incl. DRI2, OpenGL, Vulkan etc. with no performance loss, including Wayland applications.

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