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Linux 5.7 Media Updates Add H.264 / H.265 / VP9 Decode To The Meson Driver

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  • Linux 5.7 Media Updates Add H.264 / H.265 / VP9 Decode To The Meson Driver

    Phoronix: Linux 5.7 Media Updates Add H.264 / H.265 / VP9 Decode To The Meson Driver

    The media subsystem updates have landed for the Linux 5.7 kernel merge window...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Media-Updates

  • #2
    The Sony IMX219 appears to be the 8MP cam that the RPi has had for years now. Has that not worked with mainline before or what was it using before this i2c driver?

    Quick google suggests that it's previously been device specific with driver support for Pi and nvidia tegra devices. This link seems to be about discussion of those and other separate implementations to work on this mainline driver?:

    https://www.spinics.net/lists/linux-...msg103247.html

    Probably a long shot finding someone who is knowledgeable about development of such drivers, but if anyone here is.. I remember reading about SBCs having ISP chipsets to process camera output before it arrives to the CPU/GPU for Linux to use? Is that still happening with this mainline driver, or is it optional or what? I'm not too knowledgeable about this area of hardware, perhaps this driver is getting the output from the ISP over i2c and going from there?

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    • #3
      can i watch 10bit video without downgrade quality ?

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      • #4
        The Amlogic "HEVC" code that was merged for Linux 5.7 is some common code shared between the VP9 and HEVC drivers. VP9 (and supporting common code) is now merged while HEVC is still being reworked for stateful API compliance. The commit messages for the common code are easily misinterpreted unless you know the details.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Aryma View Post
          can i watch 10bit video without downgrade quality ?
          That depends more on the hardware that is used for color representation on your screen (the actual pixels and the gamut of colors they can produce). Not so much on the number of bits representing those colors. Most common displays only have very limited color gamut and cannot display a visually distinguishable picture between 8 or 10 bit colors.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by FPScholten View Post

            That depends more on the hardware that is used for color representation on your screen (the actual pixels and the gamut of colors they can produce). Not so much on the number of bits representing those colors. Most common displays only have very limited color gamut and cannot display a visually distinguishable picture between 8 or 10 bit colors.
            e.g. most notebooks have unsatisfactory displays..

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