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APT 2.0 Released For Debian Package Management

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  • APT 2.0 Released For Debian Package Management

    Phoronix: APT 2.0 Released For Debian Package Management

    Over the past year Debian developers have been working towards APT 2.0 while now it is officially released for the advanced package tool on Debian, Ubuntu, and other DEB-based platforms...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...T-2.0-Released

  • #2
    Nice. Apt one of the big reasons I cringe every time I have to upgrade a Windows machine. I got so used to the speed you can do it on Linux, that the same on Windows looks like it takes all the eternity, even if it became a bit faster in more recent Windows versions.

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    • #3
      Is it "apt" or "apt-get" now? I thought the new way was "apt" but I still see modern blog posts using "apt-get".

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      • #4
        Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
        Nice. Apt one of the big reasons I cringe every time I have to upgrade a Windows machine. I got so used to the speed you can do it on Linux, that the same on Windows looks like it takes all the eternity, even if it became a bit faster in more recent Windows versions.
        Then maybe try yum as well, to see a package manager that actually works.

        Does apt 2 have a post-transaction-actions equivalent yet? Does it have undo yet? Is apt pinning still overridden when your high prio repo is offline? I mean I face so many limitations with apt that it's beyond belief. The apt configuration is so broken I ended up having a daily cronjob with literally

        Code:
        apt -y update && apt -y dist-upgrade -o Dpkg::Options::='--force-confdef' -o Dpkg::Options::='--force-confold' && apt -y autoremove
        At least that works - most of the time. Sometimes you also need a manual apt clean, because your cache may or may not break everything for whatever reason. Gotta love that confdef/confold part too, without that apt will just happily fail forever after you have an update for a package with any default setting changed.

        The fact that a lot of 3rd party repos break all the time doesn't help either. The LunarG Vulkan repo broke last week (again), due to them renewing the Let's Encrypt cert literally in the last minute, and they don't mind the fact that while the cert might still be valid in Cali, it's expired already in Japan.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Creak View Post
          Is it "apt" or "apt-get" now? I thought the new way was "apt" but I still see modern blog posts using "apt-get".
          AFAIK, apt is meant to be a more ergonomic alternative for end users, but they are not yet sure enough about interface stabilization to recommend its use in scripts and other forms of long-lasting instructions.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by anarki2 View Post

            Then maybe try yum as well, to see a package manager that actually works.

            Does apt 2 have a post-transaction-actions equivalent yet? Does it have undo yet? Is apt pinning still overridden when your high prio repo is offline? I mean I face so many limitations with apt that it's beyond belief. The apt configuration is so broken I ended up having a daily cronjob with literally

            Code:
            apt -y update && apt -y dist-upgrade -o Dpkg::Options::='--force-confdef' -o Dpkg::Options::='--force-confold' && apt -y autoremove
            At least that works - most of the time. Sometimes you also need a manual apt clean, because your cache may or may not break everything for whatever reason. Gotta love that confdef/confold part too, without that apt will just happily fail forever after you have an update for a package with any default setting changed.

            The fact that a lot of 3rd party repos break all the time doesn't help either. The LunarG Vulkan repo broke last week (again), due to them renewing the Let's Encrypt cert literally in the last minute, and they don't mind the fact that while the cert might still be valid in Cali, it's expired already in Japan.
            Not that I believe Apt is the greatest thing since slice bread, but is not that bad eider. I have a couple external repos and things here work fine. May the problem you encountered was more a case of bad configured repo than Apt per se.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by anarki2 View Post

              Then maybe try yum as well, to see a package manager that actually works.

              Does apt 2 have a post-transaction-actions equivalent yet? Does it have undo yet? Is apt pinning still overridden when your high prio repo is offline? I mean I face so many limitations with apt that it's beyond belief. The apt configuration is so broken I ended up having a daily cronjob with literally

              Code:
              apt -y update && apt -y dist-upgrade -o Dpkg::Options::='--force-confdef' -o Dpkg::Options::='--force-confold' && apt -y autoremove
              At least that works - most of the time. Sometimes you also need a manual apt clean, because your cache may or may not break everything for whatever reason. Gotta love that confdef/confold part too, without that apt will just happily fail forever after you have an update for a package with any default setting changed.

              The fact that a lot of 3rd party repos break all the time doesn't help either. The LunarG Vulkan repo broke last week (again), due to them renewing the Let's Encrypt cert literally in the last minute, and they don't mind the fact that while the cert might still be valid in Cali, it's expired already in Japan.
              https://wiki.debian.org/DontBreakDebian

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              • #8
                other distros that have better package managers survive and even thrive on the use of third party (or unofficial) repos. OpenSUSE's Zypper for example has very sane and robust package/dependency conflict management, and also tracks what repo is used for each package, and will NOT update it from a different repo unless specifically asked for, regardless of repository priority or other things.
                I'm guessing also Yum does it.

                I've had apt try to delete half my system at least 3 times when I was using Linux Mint Debian with their normal repos, never on OpenSUSE with additional stuff from third party repos
                Last edited by starshipeleven; 03-09-2020, 07:09 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                  Not that I believe Apt is the greatest thing since slice bread, but is not that bad eider. I have a couple external repos and things here work fine. May the problem you encountered was more a case of bad configured repo than Apt per se.
                  Apt isn't robust for shit, it relies too much on repos being perfect and transactions never failing when installing. Reality is different.

                  Plus it really sucks when you have multiple repos offering the same package at different versions.

                  Of course the rate of failures isn't very high, but when it fails it's a fun couple hours to fix the mess.
                  Last edited by starshipeleven; 03-09-2020, 07:07 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I don't think you're using apt and debian based distros right.

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