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Multipath TCP Support Is Working Its Upstream - First Bits Landing With Linux 5.6

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  • #11
    Originally posted by discordian View Post
    Someone tell them that they are reinventing sctp,which is available on Linux for ages.
    The IETF was well aware of sctp. However, mptcp has better performance and is more resilient to certain path issues, in at least some use cases, and importantly can be transparent to applications (you don't have to rewrite everything).

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    • #12
      What is the state with transparent proxies in line to help connections when only one side uses mp tcp?

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      • #13
        Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

        The IETF was well aware of sctp. However, mptcp has better performance and is more resilient to certain path issues, in at least some use cases, and importantly can be transparent to applications (you don't have to rewrite everything).
        Performance maybe, but I don't think that's implicated from the protocol, but the standard sctp congestion algorithm is tuned to get out of the way to not drain tcp/udp.
        sctp is pretty much transparent, you only need to open the socket with a different protocol id. I suppose mptcp is the same?

        It can also do away with TCP's "head-of-line-blocking" and has a SOCK_SEQPACKET mode (but that's when things need special care compared to normal streams). (SEQPACKET is typically used with Unix-sockets, so thats a nice replacement if you want to route packets)

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        • #14
          Originally posted by discordian View Post
          sctp is pretty much transparent, you only need to open the socket with a different protocol id. I suppose mptcp is the same?
          No change to the app at all required. That is a big plus, and means you will not have to wait decades (for apps to change) to see benefits in certain use cases.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Etherman View Post
            I have two wifi networks configured in my home. One 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz. Wan is 250 MBit.
            Speedtest over cable gives ~252 Mbit/s, speedtest over my 5 GHz wifi gets around 160 Mbit/s
            Does this make so I can use one 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz adapter in my computer for better wifi performance?
            Does router need the support for it too?
            That is an issue with your hardware. My phone, laptop, and second PC have neither speed nor range issues with 5Ghz, despite having a plethora of other networks nearby.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by discordian View Post
              I suppose
              so you are arguing with your imagination. and who is winning?

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              • #17
                Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

                No change to the app at all required. That is a big plus, and means you will not have to wait decades (for apps to change) to see benefits in certain use cases.
                How exactly is it enabled? Kernel upgrade/flag?

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Etherman View Post
                  I have two wifi networks configured in my home. One 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz. Wan is 250 MBit.
                  Speedtest over cable gives ~252 Mbit/s, speedtest over my 5 GHz wifi gets around 160 Mbit/s
                  Does this make so I can use one 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz adapter in my computer for better wifi performance?
                  Does router need the support for it too?
                  My OpenWRT 802.11ac 3x3 MIMO provides around 400 Mbits/s. Maybe switching to a new chip / different antennas might help you.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by fuzz View Post

                    How exactly is it enabled? Kernel upgrade/flag?
                    First both kernels will need support, and they will likely not attempt Mptcp by default, but there will be a setting to attempt mptcp by default. it is an option inside the tcp handshake, so it could be attempted without any penalty if the peer doesn't support it.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by loganj View Post
                      is this for LAN only? is it even useful for regular user with or without a router?
                      If you had a phone with wifi and mobile connection it could use both at the same time. outside of that use case, it is really for helping computers within datacenters which seek to optimize network utilization, efficiency and redundancy.

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