Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SUSE Liberty Linux Announced For Mixed Linux Environments

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SUSE Liberty Linux Announced For Mixed Linux Environments

    Phoronix: SUSE Liberty Linux Announced For Mixed Linux Environments

    SUSE today formally announced SUSE Liberty Linux as its support offering for mixed Linux environments within enterprises...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-Liberty-Linux

  • #2
    If the url was wrong, it's now fixed and its' https://www.suse.com/products/suse-liberty-linux/

    Comment


    • #3
      I am kind of disappointed that SUSE isn't as popular as the other Linux distros...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
        I am kind of disappointed that SUSE isn't as popular as the other Linux distros...
        Doesn't it have to do with its Microsoft past? Or maybe it's still the case.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          I am kind of disappointed that SUSE isn't as popular as the other Linux distros...
          I think the main reason is SUSE doens't have a "flavor" of its own.
          Rolling release? Arch
          Enterprise? RHEL/CentOS/...
          Cutting edge software? Fedora
          Free 5 yr support? Ubuntu
          A purely community project? Debian

          Comment


          • #6
            Fixd :d
            Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
            I think the main reason is SUSE doens't have a "flavor" of its own.
            Rolling release? Tumbleweed
            Enterprise? SLES/SLED/Leap
            Cutting edge software? Tumbleweed
            Free 5 yr support? Leap 15.0-15.5 (2018-2024)
            A purely community project? openSUSE is good enough
            Joking aside, (open)SUSE has its pros and cons comparng to distors mentioned above (and others). But I like it and have been using it for more than 10 years now as my primary OS

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
              I think the main reason is SUSE doens't have a "flavor" of its own.
              Rolling release? Arch
              Enterprise? RHEL/CentOS/...
              Cutting edge software? Fedora
              Free 5 yr support? Ubuntu
              A purely community project? Debian
              Save for the last one, openSUSE literally offers all of those things. Their Leap distribution is built on the same binary packages as SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), so a SUSE version of that list would look like this:

              Rolling release: Tumbleweed
              Enterprise: SLE and Leap
              Cutting edge software: Tumbleweed
              Free 5+ year support: Leap

              Personally, I think it is just a question of "marketing". openSUSE does not go out of their way to promote themselves like Ubuntu does, nor does it have big name derivatives like Debian.

              What makes it rather unique for me is that KDE has always been a first class citizen. For a lot of big distributions, KDE is a bit of an afterthought and does not feel as polished or coherent as it does on openSUSE. For example, openSUSE's system management tool, YaST, is written with both Qt and GTK frontends, so it fits smoothly into both KDE and GNOME. Contrast that with Red Hat when they still included KDE, if you picked it you got half of GNOME installed. Even a distro like Mageia, a Mandrake derivative, has all of its system utilities written in GTK, so they feel sort of awkward when running in KDE (Which is not to say that the are bad). They also have an expensive selection of backports repositories which are extremely useful.

              Comment


              • #8
                I wonder how many structures rely on "Mixed Linux Environments" and not Mixed Environments.
                In which case, AD is the de facto central component. doh.

                But I guess I'm just missing the point.

                Comment


                • #9
                  SuSE was always more a European thing than anything else. It was the only Linux distribution that you used to be able to buy - boxed, with phonebook-grade manuals - in high street computer retailers in Europe (at least in UK/Germany/Sweden when I went looking). I'm sure I still have the Users Guide and Administrators Guide somewhere. Combined, the two were something like 1500 pages. The modern equivalent is the Arch wiki (with occasional detours into the Gentoo wiki for some really esoteric stuff...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cl333r View Post

                    Doesn't it have to do with its Microsoft past? Or maybe it's still the case.
                    Me too.
                    Been using it for nearly twenty years now, and always appreciated that it derives from a thoroughly engineered and maintained enterprise base.

                    Rolling release? TW
                    Enterprise? SLE/Leap
                    Cutting edge software? TW
                    Free 5 yr support? Leap major releases (if you count compatibility across a generation, i.e. 15.x / 16.x(
                    A purely community project? Opensuse
                    Immutable system? MicrosOS

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X