Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mark Shuttleworth Comments Following Ubuntu Community Friction, Uncertainty

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mark Shuttleworth Comments Following Ubuntu Community Friction, Uncertainty

    Phoronix: Mark Shuttleworth Comments Following Ubuntu Community Friction, Uncertainty

    For the past number of weeks there have been discussions ongoing about the "loss of leadership" within the Ubuntu community and as part of that the Ubuntu Community Team and Ubuntu Community Council having faded away in recent years. Following a lot of comments on the Ubuntu Discourse, Mark Shuttleworth has chimed in with his thoughts and work moving forward...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ents-Community

  • #2
    Does this all go back to dumping Kubunu leader Jonathan Riddell after his comments

    Comment


    • #3
      If you want a community just join Debian it's basically the same lol.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 9Strike View Post
        If you want a community just join Debian it's basically the same lol.
        I would argue it is better. Debian isn't steered by a for-profit company so it doesn't do things like shove snaps down our throats. I'm not a huge fan of systemd (I love the concept, I dislike the implementation and feature creep), but it's hard to beat Debian as a robust and broadly accessible platform and the community is friendly and helpful.

        Void and Slackware will forever be my go-to Linux distros, along with OpenBSD on the other side of the valley, but I keep a Debian netinstall flash drive handy so I can play with it on any new system I buy or build just to keep up with it. I also run it on a few of my Pis via Raspbian and I have no complaints there.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 9Strike View Post
          If you want a community just join Debian it's basically the same lol.
          Debian just needs a release cycle that would be justifiable for a normal user, something like each half year. Then it could replace Ubuntu in an instant because thats what it is, Debian with a better suited for normal users release cycle.

          Comment


          • #6
            I dropped Ubuntu for Debian when the Kubuntu drama occurred. And frankly I do not regret at all. With some backports it just shines, the only drawback being the (really) outdated Firefox on Stablee.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post

              Debian just needs a release cycle that would be justifiable for a normal user, something like each half year. Then it could replace Ubuntu in an instant because thats what it is, Debian with a better suited for normal users release cycle.
              Wait, normal users care more about fixed release dates than about working software? Because that is how I perceive Ubuntu: A Debian that releases on a fixed date, (nearly) no matter how many bugs are still open.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not surprised. Ubuntu used to be about being an easy way for people to transition to Linux. But within the past decade, it's gone against the grain a little too often. They do things for their own interest, rather than Linux as a whole. That isn't necessarily a bad thing, but it drives away community members. It doesn't help that so many of their own attempts/variations at things were abandoned.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gojul View Post
                  I dropped Ubuntu for Debian when the Kubuntu drama occurred. And frankly I do not regret at all. With some backports it just shines, the only drawback being the (really) outdated Firefox on Stablee.
                  What was the drama about?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gojul View Post
                    the only drawback being the (really) outdated Firefox on Stablee.
                    True but web browser companies chuck one out on a nearly daily basis. They mistakenly call them releases when really they are really only minor sub-releases.
                    Because of all these jokers, you are possibly better just downloading the binaries off their sites (and running them in a jail).

                    As for business uses where you want your boring internal business app to run for decades (think IE6 style), the old stagnating firefox's are actually fairly unique in the Linux work and though they may not match your use case (or mine), are IMO quite important for professional Linux adoption.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X