Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OpenMandriva 4.1 Released With Clang'ed LTO+PGO Packages, Linux 5.5 + More

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OpenMandriva 4.1 Released With Clang'ed LTO+PGO Packages, Linux 5.5 + More

    Phoronix: OpenMandriva 4.1 Released With Clang'ed LTO+PGO Packages, Linux 5.5 + More

    Following the recent beta release with a Clang-built kernel option and experimental Zypper as an alternative to DNF, OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 has been released as part of FOSDEM 2020 celebrations over in Brussels...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...a-4.1-Released

  • #2
    It's dead

    Comment


    • #3
      This is awesome. Love this update.

      Comment


      • #4
        This is exciting stuff. Having per-microarchitecture optimized binary builds is a project I’m really interested it. What I would be interested in knowing is (in a thorough world with native builds for each microarchitecture) what would happen if you upgraded your chip from Zen 1 to Zen 2, Skylake to Ice Lake, or even side-graded Intel -> AMD. Would every package transition to the respective version? Haven’t had the time to read into Mandriva’s implementation to see if they answer this question.

        Cheers,
        Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          It would be really nice to have both generic vs znver1 as well as gcc vs clang benchmarked

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mroche View Post
            This is exciting stuff. Having per-microarchitecture optimized binary builds is a project I’m really interested it. What I would be interested in knowing is (in a thorough world with native builds for each microarchitecture) what would happen if you upgraded your chip from Zen 1 to Zen 2, Skylake to Ice Lake, or even side-graded Intel -> AMD. Would every package transition to the respective version? Haven’t had the time to read into Mandriva’s implementation to see if they answer this question.

            Cheers,
            Mike
            I am also very interested in this per-microarchitecture optimized binary builds. Unfortunately the benchmarks on Phoronix from their last release didn't show a lot of improvements and Mandriva was still the slowest distribution tested, but I'd like to see if that is still the case and I am sure Michael does already preper the next round of benchmarks...

            As to your questions, Intel > AMD and vice versa would come down to the supported instructions, I'd guess (even some Pentiums/Celerons lack AVX/2). The chance is high that it won't work or won't perform that great (it depends though, Haswell optimized binaries could run fine with Zen 1, too). And newer > older architecture is even more complicated and in general not possible due to the lack of newer instructions on the older architecture.

            The chance is better from older > newer architecture of the same manufacturer, as they normally don't remove ISA extensions (except Bulldozer > Zen, FMA4 and other AMD-specific instructions were deprecated).

            Comment


            • #7
              By the way, I very much welcome their user-facing improvements, like the Chromium build with VAAPI, changing to ZSTD compression and all of their performance work. I will test it out once the benchmarks show that it performs better or equal to other distros.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ms178 View Post

                I am also very interested in this per-microarchitecture optimized binary builds. Unfortunately the benchmarks on Phoronix from their last release didn't show a lot of improvements and Mandriva was still the slowest distribution tested, but I'd like to see if that is still the case and I am sure Michael does already preper the next round of benchmarks...

                As to your questions, Intel > AMD and vice versa would come down to the supported instructions, I'd guess (even some Pentiums/Celerons lack AVX/2). The chance is high that it won't work or won't perform that great (it depends though, Haswell optimized binaries could run fine with Zen 1, too). And newer > older architecture is even more complicated and in general not possible due to the lack of newer instructions on the older architecture.

                The chance is better from older > newer architecture of the same manufacturer, as they normally don't remove ISA extensions (except Bulldozer > Zen, FMA4 and other AMD-specific instructions were deprecated).
                Just like in Michael wrote in previous benchmark, systems were compared in the default settings. So some systems used cpu governor performance or ondenamed, while OpenMandriva used energy-saving option. Look below:

                OpenMandriva was the only Linux distribution assembled using LLVM Clang rather than GCC, it strangely still defaults to using the conservative CPUFreq configuration, and other differences from the higher profile (and faster) Linux distributions.
                So If anyone want compare it, then it's a good idea to set the same cpu governor for everyone. I hope to see such benchmarks in the future. Comparison of systems with the same cpu governor, and znver1 vs x86_64 and gcc kernel vs clang kernel.
                It would be great

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by xpris View Post

                  Just like in Michael wrote in previous benchmark, systems were compared in the default settings. So some systems used cpu governor performance or ondenamed, while OpenMandriva used energy-saving option. Look below:



                  So If anyone want compare it, then it's a good idea to set the same cpu governor for everyone. I hope to see such benchmarks in the future. Comparison of systems with the same cpu governor, and znver1 vs x86_64 and gcc kernel vs clang kernel.
                  It would be great
                  Thanks for reminding me, I forgot that rather important detail.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ms178 View Post
                    The chance is better from older > newer architecture of the same manufacturer, as they normally don't remove ISA extensions (except Bulldozer > Zen, FMA4 and other AMD-specific instructions were deprecated).
                    I got hit by that incompatibility when i upgraded from Amd Piledriver to Zen. Some AUR packages stopped working on my system because I had compiled them with "native".

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X