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A Look At The Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance With WSL

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  • A Look At The Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance With WSL

    Phoronix: A Look At The Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance With WSL

    As the first of our Linux vs. Windows benchmarks coming around Microsoft's Windows 10 October 2018 Update, today we are exploring the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) performance to see if they have finally managed to improve the I/O performance for this Linux binary compatibility layer and how the WSL performs compared to Ubuntu and Clear Linux.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26963

  • #2
    I have a suggestion. Try benchmarking WSL with write caching on.

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    • #3
      Shouldn't it be the Linux Subsystem for Windows?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DanL View Post
        Shouldn't it be the Linux Subsystem for Windows?
        In this case its a possessive adjective followed by a dependent noun.

        The possessive is Windows, the dependent is Linux.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DanL View Post
          Shouldn't it be the Linux Subsystem for Windows?
          That'd be Wine.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by edwaleni View Post

            In this case its a possessive adjective followed by a dependent noun.

            The possessive is Windows, the dependent is Linux.
            Doesn't "Windows' Subsystem for Linux" make more sense? Or "Microsoft Linux Subsystem"

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            • #7
              So, why not test if using a clear linux image on WSL shows any perf inprovements?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dragorth View Post
                So, why not test if using a clear linux image on WSL shows any perf inprovements?
                Clear Linux isn't yet available on WSL.
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                • #9
                  In case someone wants to tweak WSL:

                  The directory with the Ubuntu tarball and manifest files is located at:

                  C:\Program Files\WindowsApps\CanonicalGroupLimited.UbuntuonWi ndows_<build number>.<release date>_x64__<GUID>

                  If you relocate it, don't forget you got to update the registry entries as well. The ubuntu.exe is just a stub.

                  Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion \AppModel\Repository\Packages\CanonicalGroupLimite d.UbuntuonWindows_1<build number>.<release date>_x64__<GUID>

                  This is just an example.

                  I am kind of curious what would happen if one simply replaced the tarball before you install it. The manifest has an entry that looks like an encryption key. If true that the "install" is encrypted, I have no proof of it. That might explain some of the overhead in the I/O.

                  I had to get around some odd Microsoft folder restrictions to reach some of the data. That Ubuntu install was owned by a system account I hadn't seen before.

                  Since I really stopped looking under Windows hood since v7, anything could surprise me. I am sure somewhere out in the ether someone has already broken out WSL in detail.

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                  • #10
                    are these tests with Windows Defender running? Defender is a huge part of the io slowdown in WSL. Turning off its real-time protection (or add a directory exclusion for your rootfs, and process exclusions for /bin/*, /sbin/*, /usr/bin/*, /usr/sbin/*, /usr/local/bin/*, /usr/local/sbin/*) can be a big gain. See https://github.com/Microsoft/WSL/issues/1932

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