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PulseAudio 11.0 Released With GNU Hurd Support, Newer Apple AirPlay Hardware

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  • #41
    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
    pa volume control shows all currently playing apps with their volume sliders
    It shows 20 times Firefox: Audiostream entries as sources for me.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by caligula View Post
      It shows 20 times Firefox: Audiostream entries as sources for me.
      so close some tabs

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      • #43
        Originally posted by pal666 View Post
        so close some tabs
        No, the problem is, this is confusing even with two tabs. This is the default, nobody browses with just one tab.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by caligula View Post
          This is the default, nobody browses with just one tab.
          i have dozens of tabs and one slider for firefox. what am i doing wrong?

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          • #45
            Originally posted by caligula View Post

            It shows 20 times Firefox: Audiostream entries as sources for me.
            Either your Firefox is completely broken or all those tabs have embedded video sources (ads or Youtube videos, most likely).
            That's definitely not normal.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by caligula View Post

              It will be interesting to see whether pulseaudio will absorb jack/asio style functionality in the future. The poettering technology is good at spreading so maybe that'll be the next goal.
              I don't understand why Jack has two forks and there's PulseAudio. Why not have a single but configurable option instead?

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              • #47
                Originally posted by timofonic View Post

                I don't understand why Jack has two forks and there's PulseAudio. Why not have a single but configurable option instead?
                Because PulseAudio and JACK serve different purposes. JACK is for real time, low latency audio as you'd find in a professional recording studio.
                PulseAudio is for general purpose audio as it's utilised by people playing video games, listening to MP3s or watching movies.

                GNU/Linux isn't the only platform where you'll find that distinct difference. There are professional sound daemons on Windows and Mac OS X too.
                Shipping them as part of the base system would introduce unnecessary maintenance and is generally a bad idea, for the same reason general purpose Linux distros don't ship with a real time kernel by default.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by unixfan2001 View Post

                  Because PulseAudio and JACK serve different purposes. JACK is for real time, low latency audio as you'd find in a professional recording studio.
                  PulseAudio is for general purpose audio as it's utilised by people playing video games, listening to MP3s or watching movies.

                  GNU/Linux isn't the only platform where you'll find that distinct difference. There are professional sound daemons on Windows and Mac OS X too.
                  Shipping them as part of the base system would introduce unnecessary maintenance and is generally a bad idea, for the same reason general purpose Linux distros don't ship with a real time kernel by default.
                  This doesn't answer the question why there needs to be totally separate applications (with two versions of JACK). There could be a configuration switch both in pulse and in the kernel. You can configure the kernel with different schedulers. RT patches are not included in mainline, but even mainline has several switches for scheduling policies. 1000Hz fully pre-emptive kernel has a lot better RTish support than 100Hz non-pre-emptive. Pulseaudio integrates so much stuff already (hotplug stuff, BT, airplay, tcp tunnels, DSP effects, per-app controls, channel mapping, bindings to all audio tech in Linux - - not even trying to list it all here), it seems pro/semipro audio is the only thing still missing. I can't understand why the latencies aren't more configurable in Pulseaudio. It's the very latest version that even allows setting a latency for loopbacks. Previously PA didn't care at all. You could set latency msec=1, but it didn't have any effect.

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by caligula View Post

                    This doesn't answer the question why there needs to be totally separate applications (with two versions of JACK). There could be a configuration switch both in pulse and in the kernel. You can configure the kernel with different schedulers. RT patches are not included in mainline, but even mainline has several switches for scheduling policies. 1000Hz fully pre-emptive kernel has a lot better RTish support than 100Hz non-pre-emptive. Pulseaudio integrates so much stuff already (hotplug stuff, BT, airplay, tcp tunnels, DSP effects, per-app controls, channel mapping, bindings to all audio tech in Linux - - not even trying to list it all here), it seems pro/semipro audio is the only thing still missing. I can't understand why the latencies aren't more configurable in Pulseaudio. It's the very latest version that even allows setting a latency for loopbacks. Previously PA didn't care at all. You could set latency msec=1, but it didn't have any effect.
                    Yes, you made a point there...

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