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Vim 8.0 Will See GTK3 Support, Async I/O, Jobs & More

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  • Vim 8.0 Will See GTK3 Support, Async I/O, Jobs & More

    Phoronix: Vim 8.0 Will See GTK3 Support, Async I/O, Jobs & More

    Vim 7.4 is still the latest stable series for this popular text editor, but Vim 8.0 development is being worked on and as implied by the version number will see a lot of new functionality...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...pment-Features

  • #2
    I wonder if people use vim or the gvim front-end more?

    Also now with async things in Vim 8.0 what happens to NeoVim?

    Btw, does Emacs have any GTK frontend?

    Off-topic: Lately I've been using Atom.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post

      Also now with async things in Vim 8.0 what happens to NeoVim?

      Off-topic: Lately I've been using Atom.
      Async was only one of the benefits neovims wants to bring. It already does some things different then vim, like killing gvim and adding its msgpack-rpc interface allowing different frontends to be made. I rather hope neovim suceeds, as it really tries to modernize vim.

      As for Atom, it really is a nice editor and i use it mostly when i am on os x, but startup time is still a issue for me.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        I wonder if people use vim or the gvim front-end more?
        Most use vim, because Linux is mostly found on servers, and people have their desktop on Windows. So they use whatever editor they want in Windows, but when logged on a server, their only choice is vim, because it is installed by default and the sysadmin would not allow anything else being installed for fear of security breach, bringing in "unnecessary" libraries to the server, one should be proficient with vim, etc... etc...

        I use vim because it is the most common denominator; Vim is always available wherever I went. It is like bash. I prefer zsh, but since it is not installed by default at most places, I turned back to bash. Thank god sh is not the default like on Solaris.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by deragon View Post
          I use vim because it is the most common denominator; Vim is always available wherever I went. It is like bash. I prefer zsh, but since it is not installed by default at most places, I turned back to bash. Thank god sh is not the default like on Solaris.
          I think you mean Vi. Vim is only found on newer Linux servers.

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          • #6
            To add to the discussion about vi being default instead of vim:
            On standard Unix systems, old vi was predominant (starting in 1990, vi was only editor pre-installed on all Unix systems).
            AFAIK, after 2000 most have vim in any form - and in IBM AIX systems I had the pleasure to administer vim was installed (proviced by IBM on special CD).
            As all Unix systems seems to get compatibility with each other due to supporting Linux, this should be at least common if not even the default - isn't it?
            Concerning Linux - I used Linux (also as administrator - and vim as editor of choice) since 1995 - I am not aware of any true vi version - all systems had vim
            only right from the start.
            Vim was available beginning of the 90s and used with Linux (also default on RHEL and SLES in 2002, when starting to adminster Linux servers - so no Linux
            server ever without vim - one may check it via e.g. http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=redhat or http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=sle).
            I can use old vi - but I would write books or larger projects only with vim.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by sharkwouter View Post
              I think you mean Vi. Vim is only found on newer Linux servers.
              I think you're a bit too conservative now. As I've understood it, most distros come with Vim these days, and just symlink "vi" to Vim, or aliases "vi" to run Vim in compatible mode.

              I'm glad NeoVim was brought up, I think that really has a chance of becoming the VimIm I'm partly using it, but it does lack some stability at the moment, so I prefer Vim. I do really look forward to NeoVim though, especially after reading the NeoVim blogs/articles on how bad Vim is (code wise and development wise).

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              • #8
                Don't forget FreeBSD and OpenBSD don't ship with Vim.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  I wonder if people use vim or the gvim front-end more?
                  I don't know a serious Linux/BSD/Solaris programmer who doesn't use either vim or emacs, unless they're writing in a language that requires a special IDE (I'm looking at you Java).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                    I wonder if people use vim or the gvim front-end more?

                    Also now with async things in Vim 8.0 what happens to NeoVim?

                    Btw, does Emacs have any GTK frontend?

                    Off-topic: Lately I've been using Atom.

                    To echo a previous comment, I use Vim because it behaves more or less the same as Vi, which is ubiquitous. You can telnet into practically any system and immediately know how to use the editor. I've tried Kate, Emacs, Atom, etc. and they're all fine - but figured if I'm going to be the expert in one, it might as well be the one I can depend on knowing the syntax for just about every system. Also, same with bash... I've dabbled in the others, but figure if I'm going to spend my time learning something, might as well be the one that is everywhere. I've played with the gvim front end, but don't usually use it.

                    Regarding nvim, just downloaded it to play with. As I understand it, it was created because of the apparent reluctance of the Vim owners to embrace new contributions. Maybe if the attitude changes, it will be merged back into the Vim project. It's always more efficient to combine forces than to strike out separately. That said, it obviously isn't always possible. Time will tell. In any event, looking forward to Vim 8.

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