Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GTK 4.2 Releasing Next Month With Likely Introducing A New OpenGL Renderer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • GTK 4.2 Releasing Next Month With Likely Introducing A New OpenGL Renderer

    Phoronix: GTK 4.2 Releasing Next Month With Likely Introducing A New OpenGL Renderer

    While the GTK 4.0 toolkit just released in December, GTK 4.2 is already gearing up for release next month with GNOME 40...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...opover-Shadows

  • #2
    Looking forward to trying Gnome 40

    Comment


    • #3
      How do you change to the vulkan render?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Laughing1 View Post
        How do you change to the vulkan render?
        Code:
        GSK_RENDERER=vulkan some-gtk4-app

        Comment


        • #5
          I just upgraded my Fedora 33 install to the branched Fedora 34 yesterday, and it has Gnome 40 running now (some parts may be lagging behind still.) My computer is a bit older Dell with an i3-2120 and 8 GB RAM, and using the iGPU on the processor. And runs good enough. Just tossing that out there

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ehansin View Post
            I just upgraded my Fedora 33 install to the branched Fedora 34 yesterday, and it has Gnome 40 running now (some parts may be lagging behind still.) My computer is a bit older Dell with an i3-2120 and 8 GB RAM, and using the iGPU on the processor. And runs good enough. Just tossing that out there
            FWIW, the graphics rendering hasn't used all that much CPU/GPU power in recent years. If you measured the load during a short period of few seconds, the rendering might show up as 1% or so (CPU). Sure, before SVGA became common, old underpowered CPUs couldn't even perform basic double-buffering without any further rendering. Well, they could have if only page flipping was available. The first gen Raspberry Pi is about as fast as Pentium 2 or 3. Even that could run Full HD desktop with smooth graphics. Your other specs aren't that bad either. Modern Linux can with zswap/zstd allows running much larger software without resorting to disk based swap. Would be more impressive if GTK/Gnome ran on some very low end < 1W embedded hardware that had support for OpenGL 4.5+ / Vulkan nonetheless.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by caligula View Post

              FWIW, the graphics rendering hasn't used all that much CPU/GPU power in recent years. If you measured the load during a short period of few seconds, the rendering might show up as 1% or so (CPU). Sure, before SVGA became common, old underpowered CPUs couldn't even perform basic double-buffering without any further rendering. Well, they could have if only page flipping was available. The first gen Raspberry Pi is about as fast as Pentium 2 or 3. Even that could run Full HD desktop with smooth graphics. Your other specs aren't that bad either. Modern Linux can with zswap/zstd allows running much larger software without resorting to disk based swap. Would be more impressive if GTK/Gnome ran on some very low end < 1W embedded hardware that had support for OpenGL 4.5+ / Vulkan nonetheless.
              Okay, interesting. Not that I was thinking things were bad before, just that Gnome 40 runs just fine on what I have. We are starting to get into some really cool "good enough" low-power computing stuff, where small, fanless boards are good enough for many basic tasks. Now sub-1W, that would be interesting!! But I imagine it will/could happen.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ehansin View Post
                Okay, interesting. Not that I was thinking things were bad before, just that Gnome 40 runs just fine on what I have.
                Sure. I have few older systems in active use so don't even consider i3 class hardware that old or low-end. One is an AMD Phenom 3-core from 2008. I think it originally had 2 GB of RAM but I've added more modules along the way, so now there's a nice set of 8GB. The GPU is some low end GT 240. It's perfectly usable for normal office use even when using the latest distros. Another is a Core 2 Duo laptop I mainly use for flashing some MCUs. It's the same, hardly any issues ever. But things change quickly when you need to browse the web, mainly due to JavaScript. Sure, both systems also have SSDs these days, but those 64GB drives are pretty low end.

                We are starting to get into some really cool "good enough" low-power computing stuff, where small, fanless boards are good enough for many basic tasks. Now sub-1W, that would be interesting!! But I imagine it will/could happen.
                Those lower end boards like Pi Zero easily run at 1W, on average, but there are even higher efficiency chips available. I guess the driver situation isn't as good. Never seen any A35 boards, for instance.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What's the idea behind using Vulkan to draw the UI? What advantadges does it bring compared to OpenGL?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by juxuanu View Post
                    What's the idea behind using Vulkan to draw the UI? What advantadges does it bring compared to OpenGL?
                    It's easier to work with Vulkan in multi-threaded environments, which allows some performance benefits if implemented correctly.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X