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KDE's KWin Compositor Sees Near Total Rewrite Of Compositing Code.

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  • #71
    Originally posted by ms178 View Post

    Right, I missed these users. But at least the technical capability is there on Kepler+ to support it if these users were willing to use their non-open driver.
    Not going to use Nvidia's proprietary driver because I have a frankenstein Debian installation which uses my own self-built libdrm, GLVND, kernel and Mesa.

    Last thing I want to do is end up unexpectedly breaking stuff after installing the proprietary driver. So I am kind of stuck with Nouveau for better or for worse.

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    • #72
      Originally posted by bug77 View Post

      You haven't been paying attention then. Martin Graesslin himself said kwin was built around X and will stay like that forever. Should you ever need something Wayland only, you should start from scratch (his words).

      Vulkan would be nice but:
      a. a DE is not heavy enough to worry about CPU overhead
      b. I don't think Vulkan drivers are vetted enough at this point
      c. Vulkan support is coming with Qt6 anyway
      What a shame. X is dying. Kwin needs heavy lifting.

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      • #73
        Did KDE fix multi-rotated screens yet? Aug/Sep killed 2 of my 3 4K screens (H config).

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        • #74
          Originally posted by numacross View Post

          Matrox introduced G400 which supported dual VGA output in 1999, and analogue monitors were capable of varying refresh rates. For LCDs seeing anything other than 60Hz has been unusual since fairly recently.
          I stumbled onto a bit more detail about this, apparently the Wayland compositor is now multi-threaded, and that's the main enabler of multiple refresh rates, each display has its own threads for dealing with it's part of the buffer(s).

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          • #75
            I've been using KDE/Plasma with compositing for years on my IceLake iGPU and have never had crashes or any of the stuff y'all are talking about here- so I'm assuming that if you don't game nor use Wayland, none of this really matters to you?

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            • #76
              Originally posted by kcrudup View Post
              I've been using KDE/Plasma with compositing for years on my IceLake iGPU and have never had crashes or any of the stuff y'all are talking about here- so I'm assuming that if you don't game nor use Wayland, none of this really matters to you?
              I think you really the nail on the head there: the main problem with support for most things is just fragmented.
              Too much stuff depends on X vs Wayland, one driver vs another, compositor backends, single vs multiple monitors and whatnot.

              Also kudos for using Ice lake for years. For us, mere mortals, Ice lake has only been available since September 2019.
              Last edited by bug77; 12 January 2021, 10:34 AM.

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              • #77
                Originally posted by andreduartesp View Post

                You know you can use any window manager with Plasma Desktop at X environment, right?
                The problem was the compositor, not window manager, and yes, you can, but if KDE is a buggy piece of shit for me out of the box, then that's obviously a good reason to use something else altogether, after all, when I'm shopping for a desktop environment, I want something that just works™ and KDE has not been it.

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                • #78
                  Originally posted by rabcor View Post
                  The problem was the compositor, not window manager, and yes, you can, but if KDE is a buggy piece of shit for me out of the box, then that's obviously a good reason to use something else altogether, after all, when I'm shopping for a desktop environment, I want something that just works™ and KDE has not been it.
                  The compositor IS the window manager. More specifically, because compositing is the act of superimposing things on top of each other while dynamically controlling their positions and movements, 'the compositor' is the bit of code inside a window manager which draws one window on top of another. When people refer to 'a compositor', or more accurately, 'a compositing window manager', they're actually referring to window managers which implement a hardware-accelerated method of compositing windows.

                  You can use any compositing window manager you want with KDE, even Compiz. Nothing's stopping you.

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