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Linux Mint Continues Developing Hypnotix As New Open-Source IPTV Player

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  • Linux Mint Continues Developing Hypnotix As New Open-Source IPTV Player

    Phoronix: Linux Mint Continues Developing Hypnotix As New Open-Source IPTV Player

    Linux Mint recently began developing a new open-source Linux IPTV player. That project "Hypnotix" is moving ahead and will be integrated with Linux Mint 20.1 while is also available as a standalone Debian package...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...notix-Progress

  • #2
    Isn't IPTV mostly used by pirates?!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Setif View Post
      Isn't IPTV mostly used by pirates?!
      no, pirate IPTV usually sucks anyway. little, or usually no guide. shoddy quality etc. the best ones are the ones that are free anyway, or ones you payfor.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Setif View Post
        Isn't IPTV mostly used by pirates?!
        My ISP has legal multicast IPTV

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Setif View Post
          Isn't IPTV mostly used by pirates?!
          I've never seen Jack Sparrow, Alestorm, Storm Seeker, Rumahoy, etc. using IPTV.

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          • #6
            my tv services uses iptv 100mb/100mb connect. Works well in FHD and have a lot of informations

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            • #7
              What will Mint do next, to try and convince us they're really doing something useful; that they're as original and user-focused as they were up to Mint 18--but never since?

              One word describes what Mint has become: "sad". One phrase serves well: "a passingly adequate version of Ubuntu".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
                What will Mint do next, to try and convince us they're really doing something useful; that they're as original and user-focused as they were up to Mint 18--but never since?

                One word describes what Mint has become: "sad". One phrase serves well: "a passingly adequate version of Ubuntu".
                I disagree, What Mint has become is "matured" not "sad". Mint originally differentiated itself by avoiding Unity and Gnome Shell. In that process, they developed Cinnamon and MATE, both of which do what they say on the tin. They aren't Red Hat or SuSE (or Canonical, although Canonical do seem to like reinventing the wheel only to abandon it later), rather than putting tons of time into back end programs that are vital-but-invisible (except when they go wrong) they appear to be attempting to improve the state of Linux for general users. Will I use this? No. But I know people who would, if it was basically idiot proof.

                I don't know why, but on occasion (Mint 19 was the last example) I have found Mint more forgiving of exotic hardware than Ubuntu... and they're supposed to be the same base OS! I don't interact with the Mint community at all, so can't comment on any issues there, but Mint Cinnamon has been my go-to Linux for "normal" desktop systems for quite a while now. It looks enough like Windows that it doesn't scare my family off instantly, but is still highly configurable. Is usable, stable and possibly a little boring a bad thing in an OS?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post

                  I disagree, What Mint has become is "matured" not "sad". Mint originally differentiated itself by avoiding Unity and Gnome Shell. In that process, they developed Cinnamon and MATE, both of which do what they say on the tin. They aren't Red Hat or SuSE (or Canonical, although Canonical do seem to like reinventing the wheel only to abandon it later), rather than putting tons of time into back end programs that are vital-but-invisible (except when they go wrong) they appear to be attempting to improve the state of Linux for general users. Will I use this? No. But I know people who would, if it was basically idiot proof.

                  I don't know why, but on occasion (Mint 19 was the last example) I have found Mint more forgiving of exotic hardware than Ubuntu... and they're supposed to be the same base OS! I don't interact with the Mint community at all, so can't comment on any issues there, but Mint Cinnamon has been my go-to Linux for "normal" desktop systems for quite a while now. It looks enough like Windows that it doesn't scare my family off instantly, but is still highly configurable. Is usable, stable and possibly a little boring a bad thing in an OS?
                  I totally embrace your right to disagree; that's what improves everyone's understanding of a subject.

                  I would like to point out that my use of the word 'sad' pertains to the state of Mint compared to what it once was, and the effort, attention, originality, and almost laser-focused attention to the user base M. Lefebvre used to give to the product. I would also like to point out that your characterization of Mint as 'mature' is somewhat unfortunate, as regards making your point, since 'mature' can also be interpreted to mean 'old', 'staid', 'hide-bound', 'lacking currency'...all of which--and more, I maintain--pertain exactly to Mint, now.

                  It's also unfortunate that you "...don't interact with the Mint community at all..."; if you did, or had, at all, you would be aware of the fact that Mint's Forum has, for several years now, been nothing more than one large 'echo chamber', in effect shouting down anyone who expresses the slightest hint of anything which could possibly be perceived as negative. This behavior is exhibited even by Clement Lefebvre's chosen--his highest-level Moderators. After being subjected to this type behavior--and reporting on it--a very well known, very well respected Linux author and 'Technical Explainer' of the highest calibre--and of many years--simply 'walked away', and has never done any reporting nor analysis of Linux Mint since.

                  Again, while I wholeheartedly agree with your expression of personal opinion; the facts are that Mint lost its first-place standing of many, MANY years almost immediately upon adopting Ubuntu 16.04 as its base, along with all the baggage that included; and Clement Lefebvre has never again brought the same hard work and originality--or desire to listen--to Mint's efforts as had once existed.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
                    I totally embrace your right to disagree; that's what improves everyone's understanding of a subject.

                    I would like to point out that my use of the word 'sad' pertains to the state of Mint compared to what it once was, and the effort, attention, originality, and almost laser-focused attention to the user base M. Lefebvre used to give to the product. I would also like to point out that your characterization of Mint as 'mature' is somewhat unfortunate, as regards making your point, since 'mature' can also be interpreted to mean 'old', 'staid', 'hide-bound', 'lacking currency'...all of which--and more, I maintain--pertain exactly to Mint, now.

                    It's also unfortunate that you "...don't interact with the Mint community at all..."; if you did, or had, at all, you would be aware of the fact that Mint's Forum has, for several years now, been nothing more than one large 'echo chamber', in effect shouting down anyone who expresses the slightest hint of anything which could possibly be perceived as negative. This behavior is exhibited even by Clement Lefebvre's chosen--his highest-level Moderators. After being subjected to this type behavior--and reporting on it--a very well known, very well respected Linux author and 'Technical Explainer' of the highest calibre--and of many years--simply 'walked away', and has never done any reporting nor analysis of Linux Mint since.

                    Again, while I wholeheartedly agree with your expression of personal opinion; the facts are that Mint lost its first-place standing of many, MANY years almost immediately upon adopting Ubuntu 16.04 as its base, along with all the baggage that included; and Clement Lefebvre has never again brought the same hard work and originality--or desire to listen--to Mint's efforts as had once existed.
                    Fair play. Thanks for the response and further detail.

                    To be honest, Mint is about the only distro with a default GUI that I don't feel the need to tweak for days until I'm comfortable using it. Aside from a few (work related) programs, systems monitors (nethogs, iotop, conky) and CUDA... I basically make no changes to it. My years of spending days tweaking every last setting to perfection (Windows 98, XP, 7, I'm looking at you) are gone due to lack of time. If another distro came along that was Debian/CentOS/Arch/Gentoo/Slackware-based and did the same, there would be nothing keeping me tied to Mint itself (not that there is now, in all honesty, beyond the comfort of familiarity)...

                    Frankly if I had the time I'd put together an Arch-, CentOS- or Gentoo-based one that has all my normal stuff in (if only for myself, although I suppose it could be fun to see it on Distrowatch or something ).

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