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CUPS Printing System Open-Source Development Has Seemingly Dried Up

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  • SystemCrasher
    replied
    Apple is toxic for opensource ppl I guess. Sure, they throw some source dumps here and there - but it doesn't makes opensource community.

    Leave a comment:


  • printman
    replied
    So we still need CUPS. I was hoping that we could finally be rid of this layer...
    Yes, CUPS handles spooling and conversion of print files to a format the printer will accept. Most printers can only print a single file at a time and don't support the full range of formats used on Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by Till Kamppeter View Post

    As it supports Apple® AirPrint® and Mopria® Print Service it works with as driverless IPP printers. These are two of the 4 driverless IPP flavors. This means that on a standard distro (using CUPS and cups-browsed) it often simply sets up automatically. If not, you can easily set it up with the CUPS web interface or system-config-printer. Under the discovered printers your printer model should appear under the network printers, as IPP printer. Then under the drivers, if you get offered to choose one, select the "driverless" one.

    Scanning works starting from SANE 1.0.29, with the "escl"backend, or if you get the separate "sane-airscan" backend (you find in on GitHub, binaries for all major distros are available). And the upcoming Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy) supports even sending faxes (if the device supports it).

    Till
    So we still need CUPS. I was hoping that we could finally be rid of this layer...

    Leave a comment:


  • Till Kamppeter
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

    I'm looking at the Canon imageCLASS LBP623Cdw.

    The product claims to support Canon PRINT Business, Canon Print Service, Google Cloud Print™, Apple® AirPrint®, Mopria® Print Service

    Does this mean I can use this printer for wireless and driverless printing in Linux without CUPS? If so, how should I go about doing it?
    As it supports Apple® AirPrint® and Mopria® Print Service it works with as driverless IPP printers. These are two of the 4 driverless IPP flavors. This means that on a standard distro (using CUPS and cups-browsed) it often simply sets up automatically. If not, you can easily set it up with the CUPS web interface or system-config-printer. Under the discovered printers your printer model should appear under the network printers, as IPP printer. Then under the drivers, if you get offered to choose one, select the "driverless" one.

    Scanning works starting from SANE 1.0.29, with the "escl"backend, or if you get the separate "sane-airscan" backend (you find in on GitHub, binaries for all major distros are available). And the upcoming Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy) supports even sending faxes (if the device supports it).

    Till

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by Till Kamppeter View Post
    First of all, you should look for driverless IPP printers. As AirPrint (the method iPhones use to print) is a flavor of driverless IPP printing and Linux also supports this flavor, simply look for AirPrint-capable devices. Other flavors are IPP Everywhere, Mopria, and Wi-Fi Direct Print, but they are less often advertised. They are also supported by Linux. And if you go with a multi-function device, if it does driverless IPP in some form it also offers driverless scanning and IPP Fax Out. So you get everything working.
    All the existing legacy free software drivers will get converted into Printer Applications soon and we have even started working on concepts to wrap proprietary classic drivers into Printer Applications.
    The printer manufacturers (at least most of them) are organized in the Printing Working Group (PWG) and the standards like IPP come from this group. OpenPrinting and the PWG work closely together and we have an annual meeting. So the manufacturers are aware of the deprecation and soon removal of PPDs and the new standard way of Printer Applications.

    Till
    I'm looking at the Canon imageCLASS LBP623Cdw

    The product claims to support Canon PRINT Business, Canon Print Service, Google Cloud Print™, Apple® AirPrint®, Mopria® Print Service

    Does this mean I can use this printer for wireless and driverless printing in Linux without CUPS? If so, how should I go about doing it?

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by royce View Post

    Best thing I ever did was to get a decent, multifunction b/w laser printer/scanner unit (Brother DCP-7055). Toner is very cheap, does not dry and laser prints very quickly. If I were to replace it I'd basically like a network-enabled version of it. I'm not sure what the state of network scanners is in Linux though.
    I have a HP scanner/printer, works well with Xsane. I may have used Skanlite with it too.

    Leave a comment:


  • aht0
    replied
    Originally posted by stiiixy View Post
    Speaking of National ID card's, something we Aussies have been toying with since, what, the 80's? what are the ACTUAL negative's regarding them? REAL security issues, caveats. How are existing system's implemented and some of their negatives, and if 'the system' was exposed, what would be leaked. How, and what are all the bonuses? If EU nations are doing it, with their added extra layer of EUness to boot, surely we (with NZ/PNG?) could implement something similar.
    Actual negatives? IF there is security vulnerability in smartcards themselves, it may lead to mass-replacement of ID cards while at the same time access to e-services is disabled. It may also lead to stolen or hacked ID's used electronically. Former has happened, latter cases I am not aware of. It's principally using public/private key pairs, nothing experimental.

    3 years a go some scientist found vulnerability/weakness (cant recall, might have been done lack of sufficient randomness) in certificates of certain series of issued ID cards and it almost toppled government because initially it was covered up (starting from smartcard vendor who tried to claim there was no vulnerability) while government agency responsible tried to work around the issue. Overall it was first case of to do with security vulnerabilities over nearly 2 decades of use.

    Final result: Bunch of ID cards had to be replaced, everybody had to generate new certificates and government changed the vendor of smartcards. People who did not re-generate new certificates had their smartcards stop working with government e-services. Such still remain valid as normal non-electronic documents until expiration.

    Another negative: voting system is pretty transparent but cannot avoid cases where someone with another's ID at hand would cast a vote not his/her own. Doesn't have to mean stolen ID - might be elder care homes, where leadership is tasked with holding the documents of their patients. Few cases have surfaced where suspiciously votes from some care home unerringly go to to director of same, who's participating on elections.

    Leave a comment:


  • Till Kamppeter
    replied
    First of all, you should look for driverless IPP printers. As AirPrint (the method iPhones use to print) is a flavor of driverless IPP printing and Linux also supports this flavor, simply look for AirPrint-capable devices. Other flavors are IPP Everywhere, Mopria, and Wi-Fi Direct Print, but they are less often advertised. They are also supported by Linux. And if you go with a multi-function device, if it does driverless IPP in some form it also offers driverless scanning and IPP Fax Out. So you get everything working.
    All the existing legacy free software drivers will get converted into Printer Applications soon and we have even started working on concepts to wrap proprietary classic drivers into Printer Applications.
    The printer manufacturers (at least most of them) are organized in the Printing Working Group (PWG) and the standards like IPP come from this group. OpenPrinting and the PWG work closely together and we have an annual meeting. So the manufacturers are aware of the deprecation and soon removal of PPDs and the new standard way of Printer Applications.

    Till

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by Till Kamppeter View Post
    Hi, I am Till Kamppeter, leader of the OpenPrinting project (site link in my profile). I am closely working together with Michael Sweet. I am also organizer of the mentioned Microconference on Linux Plumbers, both 2019 and 2020.
    If you look into my monthly news posts on the OpenPrinting web site (under "News and Events") you see in the "CUPS" sections that Apple's CUPS development is dormant and in the September news you see that I have started a (hopefully temporary) fork of CUPS on the OpenPrinting GitHub (link in the "CUPS" section of the September news). Both Michael Sweet and me have committed already some fixes there. In case that Apple does finally cease CUPS development I will continue the project together with Michael Sweet on OpenPrinting.
    CUPS will still be needed in Linux. CUPS spools jobs (not all Printer Applications or native IPP printers do that), pre-filters the PDF coming from the user applications into a format the printer (or Printer Application) understands (IPP does not require that an IPP printer/server understands PDF), and shares printers over the network, also with sophisticated authentication systems like Kerberos.
    CUPS will drop PPD file support soon (this is one of the major changes on the roadmap), so classic drivers consisting of PPDs and filters are not supported any more and Printer Applications are the only form to supply printer drivers.
    Please refer to the Linux Plumbers Microconferences, the OpenPrinting Summit/PWG meetings (see OpenPrinting web site, "News and Events"), and my monthly OpenPrinting news posts.

    Till
    If that is going to be the case, what printer should I get nowadays in order to enjoy driverless networked printing on Linux?

    Most of the the printers available in the market today have only Windows/macOS drivers, and those that do offer Linux drivers usually either provide only a PPD or in most other cases, a CUPS driver that is little more than a bundle of proprietary libraries and a custom PPD that depends on said proprietary libraries.

    Leave a comment:


  • stiiixy
    replied
    Speaking of National ID card's, something we Aussies have been toying with since, what, the 80's? what are the ACTUAL negative's regarding them? REAL security issues, caveats. How are existing system's implemented and some of their negatives, and if 'the system' was exposed, what would be leaked. How, and what are all the bonuses? If EU nations are doing it, with their added extra layer of EUness to boot, surely we (with NZ/PNG?) could implement something similar.

    Leave a comment:

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