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Firefox 72 Released With Picture-In-Picture Video Support Working On Linux

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  • #21
    Originally posted by brainlet_pederson

    It makes perfect sense. They've been hiring based on diversity quotas and Adversity Olympics instead of technical excellence. Their downward spiral into irrelevance is a classic example of what happens to a company when they fill their ranks with mediocre SJWs.
    You're an idiot who hasn't bothered to read about Mozilla's history or take a look at who's working there.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by brainlet_pederson

      That's true, but Google is a much bigger company, where it's easier for the competent people to pick up the slack created by diversity hires...

      Google also has piles of cash to burn, whereas Mozilla is a one-product shop whose one product is becoming irrelevant. It won't be long before one of the Android bloatware browsers has a bigger market share than Firefox...
      I see that you're brainless pedersen, an idiot troll who hasn't achieved shit in their life, and can only talk down to others.

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      • #23
        I did use Firefox from 2006 till 2019, except a couple of years with SeaMonkey. Stopped with ver 68-69 because videos would constantly freeze while on fullscreen. Actually I had that problem years ago, but back them it was blamed on Flash... now I have no idea.

        Version 72 has the same issue. No matter if I used my Integrated Intel drivers or discrete AMD. Plus I always ad that annoying issue with videos playing at 480p and having to select 1080 manually on Youtube. I am not fan of Chromium, but I got really tired of waiting for a fix or trying to sort for this bug.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post

          I see that you're brainless pedersen, an idiot troll who hasn't achieved shit in their life, and can only talk down to others.
          He is right though. Firefox is going downhill, and they dont even care about linux despite Linux users disproportionately using Firefox more than on other platforms, and purple haired trannies is a part of it and a legitimate concern.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by vladimir86 View Post
            I did use Firefox from 2006 till 2019, except a couple of years with SeaMonkey. Stopped with ver 68-69 because videos would constantly freeze while on fullscreen. Actually I had that problem years ago, but back them it was blamed on Flash... now I have no idea.

            Version 72 has the same issue. No matter if I used my Integrated Intel drivers or discrete AMD. Plus I always ad that annoying issue with videos playing at 480p and having to select 1080 manually on Youtube. I am not fan of Chromium, but I got really tired of waiting for a fix or trying to sort for this bug.
            Use MPV to play youtube videos, for example using an extension that allows you to open a webpage in another program.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by 240Hz View Post

              Use MPV to play youtube videos, for example using an extension that allows you to open a webpage in another program.
              There is also something funny at hand: when I use YT in FF, a certain video uses a certain percentage of my machine's computing power. When I run the same video f.i. in FF with the ViewTube add-on, there is way less computing power needed. And when I open the same video in VLC (f.i. with help of the 'Open in VLC media player add-on'), it needs even less resources - probably 1/4 of what is needed with normal use of YT.

              (Edit: seems like VLC plays f.i. 720p with 30 frames, while YT plays it with 60 frames. Yet on older machines, the use of VLC makes really sense...)
              Last edited by sverris; 01-07-2020, 06:08 AM.

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              • #27
                For GNOME Shell users, Window Corner Preview or Miniview extensions already provide this functionality for any window of your choosing, regardless of worskpace, and are therefore more versatile.
                You can detach a tab from Firefox, make it fullscreen, move it to a dedicated workspace, then have one of those extensions pick it up and provide the same PiP experience.

                https://extensions.gnome.org/extensi...orner-preview/
                https://extensions.gnome.org/extension/1459/miniview/

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by hax0r View Post
                  Lower WebRender CPU usage please, my Thinkpad T430S turns into space heater when using youtube even though I use hardware decoding and force H264 playback with h264ify.
                  The problem is potentially dmabuf, which is actively being worked on. But so far what is implement yields no performance improvement, it is slated only for wayland, but at least for Chrome it seems to improve CPU usage substantially during video playback, especially on HiDPI.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by brainlet_pederson
                    Firefox is a completely dead browser. Their market share is in the single digits now. It just goes to show -- you can't just hire dozens of blue-haired SJWs into software engineering roles and hope they'll produce quality work. Especially not when you're competing with Google.
                    Except that Firefox market share is actually increasing and is expected to be in double digits again shortly...

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by fguerraz View Post

                      The problem is potentially dmabuf, which is actively being worked on. But so far what is implement yields no performance improvement, it is slated only for wayland, but at least for Chrome it seems to improve CPU usage substantially during video playback, especially on HiDPI.
                      dmabuf helps when you don't want to be copying pixels around.

                      If you're decoding a video, you can pass a memory buffer to the decoder that represents the subsurface and have it render there which avoids copying, which eats away at CPU.

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