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FreeBSD 12.0 Officially Released

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  • FreeBSD 12.0 Officially Released

    Phoronix: FreeBSD 12.0 Officially Released

    FreeBSD 12.0 has made its debut as the latest stable version of this popular BSD operating system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-12.0-Released

  • #2
    Since no one else will say it. Whoop. Nice job peeps!

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    • #3
      Congratulations to FreeBSD team. Was waiting for FreeBSD 12.0 release, for installing on my desktop. ZFS seems to be too much for a single hard drive system, I guess. Will use UFS2 with SU+J as, it seems the default.

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      • #4
        If you wanted to use drive encryption, going with ZFS is easier. You can combine GELI encryption with UFS (up to 256bit AES-XTS with 4096bit keys) but it has to be done from shell, outside installer, sadly.

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        • #5
          I've been running 12.0-RELEASE for 4 days now on my NAS / media server. I compiled it myself once it hit their SVN repo. It's working great.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aht0 View Post
            You can combine GELI encryption with UFS (up to 256bit AES-XTS with 4096bit keys) but it has to be done from shell, outside installer, sadly.
            Not true.

            For FreeBSD 12.0-RELEASE it is available from the bsdinstall installer, I described this method of installation here:

            FreeBSD Desktop – Part 2.1 – Install FreeBSD 12
            https://vermaden.wordpress.com/2018/...ll-freebsd-12/

            If you have any questions them let me know.

            Regards.



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            • #7
              deepclutch Running ZFS on a single drive is, IMHO, worthy of consideration. You still get useful features such as snapshotting, file integrity verification, filesystem send/receive, transparent compression, extended attributes, and (my favorite) fast, reliable reboots with little fear of data corruption even if you (like me) manage to crash your system repetitively. There is a price for all of this, ZFS is not meant to be used on RAM-constrained systems, i myself do not use it for personal systems with less than 16 GB. Performance-wise, i would rate it as pleasantly fast when paired with fast (SSD) hardware, however it is not the filesystem to win benchmarks with. The FreeBSD implementation is, in my experience, very mature, we have been using it since the last 3 major releases for production machines without issue

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              • #8
                I've got ZFS root on my laptop (Arch now; will be FreeBSD once Trident 18.12 ships). Being able to zfs send my home directory to my NAS, which includes all the (frequent) snapshots, is a killer feature. Boot environments will be available once I convert the system to FreeBSD. Compression would be useful if I didn't have a 1TB drive, and of course you don't need all the file integrity protection until you do.

                I even use ZFS on VPSes that only have 2GB of RAM. There's nominally a performance sacrifice there, but if I ever do something where performance matters I'll either provision larger instances or optimize more for speed.

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                • #9
                  Can I use FreeBSD with my btrfs partitions?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MrMorden View Post
                    I even use ZFS on VPSes that only have 2GB of RAM.
                    I use ZFS on a FreeBSD 10.4 server with only 512MB RAM. It prints a warning at boot that more RAM is recommended, but I've never had any problems with it. It even uses a ZFS volume for swap.

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