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Ubuntu 19.10 To Drop 32-bit x86 Packages

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  • #91
    Originally posted by Raka555 View Post
    It is also ironic that games, that are by far the most demanding software, run very well on 32bit.

    It is probably because game developers have a much better understanding of the hardware and how to write proper programs.
    Not all games, though. Even on the best high-end computers, OMSI2 runs like sh*t because it's 32-bit. Not only users say that, but the devs have also acknowledged that (and given the fact they created such a gigantic game (as in: size/code/etc.) I trust that they know what they're talking about).

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    • #92
      Originally posted by shmerl View Post
      Rather, those who need it will just migrate to other distros.
      If ever. I mean: 18.04 still supports 32-bit and is supported until 2028. Chances are, those who currently need 32-bit, will have moved on by 2028.

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Weasel View Post
        Retarded analogy. Software (and games) doesn't have a "lifespan", just as old movies don't have a "lifespan".
        Enlighten me, how can I play a movie from 1922 using the original tape it was recorded on on my laptop? Do I just open up the casing of my laptop and jam the movie in it or...?

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        • #94
          It is the stupidest idea they have ever made.
          This will prevent users from using of 32-bit software, including:
          - WINE
          - Steam
          - 32-bit games from GOG, Humble Bundle, Game Jolt, Itch.io, IndieGala, Groupees, etc.
          - a lot of the closed-source software
          - some of the open source software, i.e. PCSX2, quickbms, etc.

          WINE without support for PE32 executables is completely useless.
          https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...20#post1024120
          Originally posted by WINE
          64-bit Wine built without 32-bit support will not be able to run ANY 32-bit applications, which most Windows binaries are. Even many 64-bit programs still include 32-bit components!
          And don't even mention about Flatpak. It has the worst multilib solution ever created. It is impossible to build 32-bit deps in 64-bit packages. The best you can do in such a situation is to provide pre-compiled binaries. But to do this you need a system with support for 32-bit binaries, so you can forget about flatpaking mixed 32-/64-bit software (such as Steam, WINE, PlayOnLinux/Phoenicis, Lutris, etc.) on Ubuntu 19.10+.
          https://github.com/flatpak/freedeskt...ges/issues/101

          What's worse, Flatpak is simply not suitable for a lot of programs, and never will be.
          https://github.com/flathub/flathub/p...ment-405826821
          https://github.com/flathub/flathub/p...ment-414686941

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          • #95
            Originally posted by ThoreauHD View Post
            I think it's time. Netbooks/shitboxes are cancer anyway.
            It is not about supporting ancient hardware. It is about supporting software like Steam, WINE, Proton, PlayOnLinux/Phoenicis, Lutris, etc. - mainly a lot of games and Windows software.

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            • #96
              Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
              Hopefully if Steam are on the ball they'll provide a 64bit client, and just enough libraries (and probably drivers too) to keep 32bit games working
              It won't help, because you still need a 32-bit version of at least glibc and OpenGL/Vulkan libs. The Steam Runtime doesn't provide it and never will be, because it is out of the scope of this solution.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by xpris View Post
                Half or even more steam games need 32bit libs but steam-runtime can save it. Most on GOG need it too. Steam itself is 32bit for now. I hope they release soon 64-bit Steam.
                Dont know what with some old games or wine32 games?
                It is easy. Just forget about them! Ubuntu developers know better what you need or not.
                Alternatively, you can wait a quarter of a century until someone creates a free/open-source clone...

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                • #98
                  Originally posted by chroma View Post
                  Well, supporting a 34-year-old architecture on a mainline desktop OS probably doesn't make much sense. And people running 32-bit x86 hardware still have Linux distro options such as Debian/i386. I grew increasingly frustrated trying to keep an old Athlon XP box running in the basement (nice space heater) when "i386" binaries would nevertheless expect SSE2 support (how is that not an i686 binary?!) etc.
                  Again, it is not about supporting 32-bit hardware. It is about supporting 32-bit software!

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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by Niarbeht View Post

                    There's a difference between a 32-bit OS and having multilib support. They aren't going to stop shipping 32-bit compatibility libraries, but they are going to stop shipping an operating system that can boot on a Pentium 3.
                    But this is exactly about dropping support for 32-bit software. And yes, it includes multilib support too.

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                    • Originally posted by cl333r View Post
                      I'm all for that, otherwise Steam on Linux will stay 32bit for the next 20 years.
                      You want to sacrifice most of the Linux games just because you would like to use a 64-bit version of the Steam client?! Why do you even need this?! Does it consume more than 2 GB of RAM? Does it extensively use 64-bit integers? Just tell me why?!
                      Valve could provide a 64-bit client a long time ago. They didn't do it because they couldn't, but because they knew how it would end - dropping support for 32-bit software in a various Linux distributions. Unfortunately, even Steam and WINE didn't stop Ubuntu developers from making an extremely idiotic decision.

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