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Systemd Lands Support For "XBOOTLDR" Extended Boot Loader

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  • #21
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
    Boot managers are mostly useless these days (in theory) if you have a decent UEFI implementation, as Linux includes an EFI stub
    I disagree. I want my boot process to go like this:

    motherboard -> EFI -> This fancy new systemd thing -> Coreboot -> BIOS emulation -> GRUB stage 1 in MBR -> LILO -> GRUB stage 2 -> GRUB stage 3 -> ... -> GRUB stage 42 -> Linux hypervisor -> The one Linux guest running on that hypervisor -> PID1!



    (IDK if that's even possible)

    (if it is possible I will use said setup to immediately boot into an X instance which is only running a full screen super nintendo emulator which loads up a custom homebrew ROM which provides me with basic web browsing and word processing capabilities)

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    • #22
      Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

      Code:
      efibootmgr --bootnext
      ?

      The issue here is that it bypasses your boot manager, and I guess that DEs have a hard time adding support for every boot manager under the sun. See also grub-reboot (needs GRUB_DEFAULT=saved) and a quick search turned out https://gist.github.com/Darkhogg/82a...3b1bd1362f5b8c for rEFInd

      Boot managers are mostly useless these days (in theory) if you have a decent UEFI implementation, as Linux includes an EFI stub I quite like rEFInd, though...
      i wish DEs would support efi boot manager.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
        First is not "modular" but modular, modular does not imply without specific dependencies(at least get your terminology right).
        I'll just call that a systemd plugin, so our views on modularity won't be triggered.

        Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
        About not require other systemd dependencies, i'm not actually sure since i never even tried it that way since i have 0% need of not using systemd. that question should be better asked on systemd mailling lists i guess
        My administration works the opposite: things need to get in, not somehow happen there and eventually get out. I just saw this only works with UEFI though, so for me the problem solved itself since I don't have a UEFI PC.

        Originally posted by Slithery View Post
        Did you even read the linked article?
        Did you even read what I replied to?

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        • #24
          does systemd already come with a built-in Linux kernel replacement?

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Spam View Post
            The SystemD OS and kernel is soon here... Might not even be a bad idea 💡
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g85yri1kfJo

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Compartmentalisation View Post

              Hey that is Windows 10 on UEFI. You can click 'reboot', or hold shift during and you can select the different UEFI registered bootloaders, so it'll say "Ubuntu" or "Fedora" or "Linux Boot Manager" and stuff. You can also select devices like a bootable USB disk or network devices.

              On systemd based systems there's already 'systemctl reboot --firmware-setup' so maybe it's possible to do the rest if someone writes it.

              Recovery and Download are 2 things that in the UEFI world mean the motherboard firmware; no need for different partitions or fastboot modes.
              if you mean with select bootable USB, your choice is: USB Drive, USB Drive, or USB Class Device, then, ... yes: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bude1d9Biuk/

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              • #27
                What I don't like about systemd-boot is it doesn't automatically update the entries in menu when a kernel update has occurred. In Ubuntu or Fedora, to name a few, when doing an apt upgrade/dnf upgrade resulting in a new installed kernel, a new Grub entry is generated without manual intervention: systemd-boot doesn't do that and it's a little cumbersome

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by q2dg View Post
                  What I don't like about systemd-boot is it doesn't automatically update the entries in menu when a kernel update has occurred. In Ubuntu or Fedora, to name a few, when doing an apt upgrade/dnf upgrade resulting in a new installed kernel, a new Grub entry is generated without manual intervention: systemd-boot doesn't do that and it's a little cumbersome
                  systemd-boot doesn't need new entries for kernel updates, though? I use it on my Arch Linux systems that get kernel updates at least once a week and I haven't had to touch the systemd-boot entries since I first set it up months ago.

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                  • #29
                    Stop your stupid self advertising!

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by hotaru View Post

                      systemd-boot doesn't need new entries for kernel updates, though? I use it on my Arch Linux systems that get kernel updates at least once a week and I haven't had to touch the systemd-boot entries since I first set it up months ago.
                      I haven't experienced this automatic entry upgrade In Ubuntu or Fedora systems...so this may be this something particular shipped in Arch (and thus, maybe out of scope of systemd-boot too). It's worth investigating

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