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Systemd Lands Support For "XBOOTLDR" Extended Boot Loader

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  • #11
    Originally posted by boxie View Post

    sifn't use lilo :P
    lilo is ancient history maaaaan... ya gotta get elilo:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/elilo/

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
      It would be awesome if this can be then used by Linux desktop environments to create a more complex restart menu like:
      -Restart into Linux (same distro)
      -Restart into Windows (or other operating system)
      Or even more complex like my Lineage OS has on my phone
      - Restart into System (same operating system)
      - Restart into Recovery mode
      - Restart into Download mode
      I don't know what Recovery and Download mode equivalent for Linux would be, but in any case the "Restart into Windows" for me would be very helpful.
      It's possible to do that even now if you use systemd and its bootloader, just not with a gui.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
        It would be awesome if this can be then used by Linux desktop environments to create a more complex restart menu like:
        -Restart into Linux (same distro)
        -Restart into Windows (or other operating system)
        Or even more complex like my Lineage OS has on my phone
        - Restart into System (same operating system)
        - Restart into Recovery mode
        - Restart into Download mode
        I don't know what Recovery and Download mode equivalent for Linux would be, but in any case the "Restart into Windows" for me would be very helpful.
        If you have a phone with multiboot Linux, Restart into Linux and Restart into LineageOS Recovery would be nice to have as well

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        • #14
          Originally posted by jrch2k8 View Post
          Awesome and for those whining, systemd-boot is not a hard replacement for anything just a way lighter(better depending your needs) implementation of existing standards.
          Can I use this without systemd or as any other "modular" services it must be forked out?

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          • #15
            I wish coreboot would be a standard, as skipping a slow BIOS or UEFI and going straight to the bootloader (GNU GRUB seems to be the only good one around with robust support for file systems and operating systems) is the best approach. In fact, not having to put up with MBR or anything like it is enough to make it appealing to me.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Shiba View Post
              Can I use this without systemd or as any other "modular" services it must be forked out?
              First is not "modular" but modular, modular does not imply without specific dependencies(at least get your terminology right).

              About not require other systemd dependencies, i'm not actually sure since i never even tried it that way since i have 0% need of not using systemd. that question should be better asked on systemd mailling lists i guess

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
                It would be awesome if this can be then used by Linux desktop environments to create a more complex restart menu like:
                -Restart into Linux (same distro)
                -Restart into Windows (or other operating system)
                Or even more complex like my Lineage OS has on my phone
                - Restart into System (same operating system)
                - Restart into Recovery mode
                - Restart into Download mode
                I don't know what Recovery and Download mode equivalent for Linux would be, but in any case the "Restart into Windows" for me would be very helpful.
                Hey that is Windows 10 on UEFI. You can click 'reboot', or hold shift during and you can select the different UEFI registered bootloaders, so it'll say "Ubuntu" or "Fedora" or "Linux Boot Manager" and stuff. You can also select devices like a bootable USB disk or network devices.

                On systemd based systems there's already 'systemctl reboot --firmware-setup' so maybe it's possible to do the rest if someone writes it.

                Recovery and Download are 2 things that in the UEFI world mean the motherboard firmware; no need for different partitions or fastboot modes.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Compartmentalisation View Post

                  Hey that is Windows 10 on UEFI. You can click 'reboot', or hold shift during and you can select the different UEFI registered bootloaders, so it'll say "Ubuntu" or "Fedora" or "Linux Boot Manager" and stuff. You can also select devices like a bootable USB disk or network devices.

                  On systemd based systems there's already 'systemctl reboot --firmware-setup' so maybe it's possible to do the rest if someone writes it.

                  Recovery and Download are 2 things that in the UEFI world mean the motherboard firmware; no need for different partitions or fastboot modes.
                  Code:
                  efibootmgr --bootnext
                  ?

                  The issue here is that it bypasses your boot manager, and I guess that DEs have a hard time adding support for every boot manager under the sun. See also grub-reboot (needs GRUB_DEFAULT=saved) and a quick search turned out https://gist.github.com/Darkhogg/82a...3b1bd1362f5b8c for rEFInd

                  Boot managers are mostly useless these days (in theory) if you have a decent UEFI implementation, as Linux includes an EFI stub I quite like rEFInd, though...

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Shiba View Post
                    Can I use this without systemd or as any other "modular" services it must be forked out?

                    Did you even read the linked article? It's right there at the top...

                    The Boot Loader Specification defines a scheme how different operating systems can cooperatively manage a boot loader configuration directory, that accepts drop-in files for boot menu items that are defined in a format that is shared between various boot loader implementations, operating systems, and userspace programs.

                    This is a specification, not a piece of software.
                    Last edited by Slithery; 03-01-2019, 02:16 PM.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Compartmentalisation View Post

                      Hey that is Windows 10 on UEFI. You can click 'reboot', or hold shift during and you can select the different UEFI registered bootloaders, so it'll say "Ubuntu" or "Fedora" or "Linux Boot Manager" and stuff. You can also select devices like a bootable USB disk or network devices.

                      On systemd based systems there's already 'systemctl reboot --firmware-setup' so maybe it's possible to do the rest if someone writes it.

                      Recovery and Download are 2 things that in the UEFI world mean the motherboard firmware; no need for different partitions or fastboot modes.
                      Wow, that's very cool and I hope someday will get into KDE as well the similar way you described, with or without the help of systemd.
                      I am not and never will use Windows 10, but anyway thanks for sharing this! I had no idea that some OS has already implemented this.

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